India
Practice Relating to the Prohibition of Certain Types of Landmines
In 1995, during a debate in the First Committee of the UN General Assembly, India stated:
Having agreed to the extension of the scope of the Protocol to non-international armed conflicts as defined in the Geneva Conventions, [India] has proposed a ban on the use of land-mines in such conflicts and a ban on the transfer of these weapons … We would, therefore, be happy to join other sponsors of the draft resolution on a moratorium on the export of land-mines, with the goal of their eventual elimination as viable and humane alternatives are developed. 
India, Statement before the First Committee of the UN General Assembly, UN Doc. A/C.1/ 50/PV.11, 26 October 1995, p. 20.
At the First Annual Conference of High Contracting Parties to Amended Protocol II to the Convention on Certain Conventional Weapons in 1999, India stated that it
remains committed to the objective of a non-discriminatory, universal and global ban on anti-personnel mines through a phased process that addresses the legitimate defence requirements of States, while at the same time ameliorating the humanitarian crises that have resulted from an irresponsible transfer and indiscriminate use of landmines. 
India, Statement at the First Annual Conference of High Contracting Parties to Amended Protocol II to the Convention on Certain Conventional Weapons, Geneva, 15 December 1999.
In 2003, at the 5th Annual Conference of the States Parties to Amended Protocol II to the Convention on Certain Conventional Weapons, the head of the Indian delegation stated:
Mr. President, India supports the vision of a world free of the threat of landmines and explosive remnants of war to enable individuals and communities to live in a safe environment conducive to development. We remain fully committed to the ultimate objective of a non‐discriminatory universal and global ban on anti‐personnel mines in a manner that addresses the legitimate defence requirements of the States. India believes that the process of complete elimination of Anti‐Personnel Landmines will be facilitated by the availability of appropriate militarily effective, non‐lethal and cost effective alternative technologies. This will enable the legitimate defensive role of anti‐personnel landmines for operational requirements, to be addressed, thereby furthering our objective.
India remains committed to full and effective implementation of the [1996] Amended Protocol II [to the 1980 Convention on Certain Conventional Weapons] and has taken all the required measures to ensure the compliance with its provisions. India has implemented the stipulated technical modifications in the design of the anti‐personnel landmines to make them detectable. The production of non‐detectable mines has been discontinued since January 1997. As we have reported, India has completed design and development of detectable anti‐personnel mines, affixed with 8 grams of iron and a programme has been evolved to ensure that implementation is completed well before the stipulated period, as per provisions laid down in Amended Protocol II. Moreover, as stated earlier, India observes a formal moratorium of unlimited duration prohibiting all exports of landmines. In India, the production and use of landmines is restricted to the agencies of the federal Government and there is no manufacture or trade in landmines in the private sector.
Further, India has taken several steps in order to sensitize the armed forces and to increase public awareness of issues related to anti‐personnel landmines, including dissemination of a booklet on India’s position on landmines and her obligations under Amended Protocol II to all armed forces headquarters, formations and units, organization on a frequent basis of presentations and seminars, inclusion of this subject in the syllabi of relevant army courses and regular interaction among agencies of the Government of India for exchange of views and information on the implementation of the provisions of Amended Protocol II. 
India, Statement by the head of the Indian delegation at the 5th Annual Conference of the States Parties to Amended Protocol II to the Convention on Certain Conventional Weapons, 26 November 2003.
In 2005, at the 7th Annual Conference of the States Parties to Amended Protocol II to the Convention on Certain Conventional Weapons, the head of the Indian delegation stated:
India’s commitment to AP II [the 1996 Amended Protocol II to the Convention Certain Conventional Weapons] is testified by its full and effective implementation of the provisions of the Protocol. As required by the Protocol, design and development of detectable anti-personnel mines has been completed, necessary technical issues resolved and requisite financial support obtained to effect these modifications. The concerned agencies have formulated and disseminated a comprehensive roadmap to ensure that the commitments are met well before the stipulated deadline. India has not produced non-detectable mines since January 1997. India also observes a formal moratorium on export of landmines and favours an outright ban on transfer of mines even to States Parties to the Protocol. In India, the production, trade and use of landmines is solely vested with agencies of the Union Government. 
India, Statement by the Head of the Indian Delegation at the 7th Annual Conference of the States Parties to Amended Protocol II to the Convention on Certain Conventional Weapons, 23 November 2005.