Related Rule
Israel
Practice Relating to Rule 74. Chemical Weapons
Israel’s Manual on the Laws of War (1998) states: “Today 128 countries are signatories to [the 1925 Geneva Gas Protocol], whose provisions are regarded as customary practice, thereby making it binding on all countries, irrespective of whether they signed the Protocol.” 
Israel, Laws of War in the Battlefield, Manual, Military Advocate General Headquarters, Military School, 1998, p. 20.
Israel’s Manual on the Rules of Warfare (2006) states:
In 1925, the countries of the world gathered in an international congress in Geneva and signed a protocol completely banning the use of chemical and bacteriological (biological) weapons. All the leading countries in the world signed the Protocol, with the exception of the United States and Japan. Today, 133 countries have signed the Protocol, and its provisions are considered to be overriding, that is to say that they are binding on every country in the world, including those that never signed the Protocol. 
Israel, Rules of Warfare on the Battlefield, Military Advocate-General’s Corps Command, IDF School of Military Law, Second Edition, 2006, p. 18.
The Manual on the Rules of Warfare (2006) is a second edition of the Manual on the Laws of War (1998).
In 1987, during a debate in the First Committee of the UN General Assembly, Israel condemned the use of chemical weapons in the Iran–Iraq War and chemical attacks against the civilian population and expressed alarm that the Syrian Arab Republic had developed chemical weapons and that the Islamic Republic of Iran had used them. 
Israel, Statement before the First Committee of the UN General Assembly, UN Doc. A/C.1/42/PV.16, 22 October 1987, p. 22.
In 1991, during a debate in the First Committee of the UN General Assembly, Israel stated that it wanted the Middle East to be a zone free from chemical weapons. 
Israel, Statement before the First Committee of the UN General Assembly, UN Doc. A/C.1/46/PV.19, 28 October 1991, p. 23.
In 1995, during a debate in the First Committee of the UN General Assembly, Israel stated that it had repeatedly called for the elimination of chemical weapons. 
Israel, Statement before the First Committee of the UN General Assembly, UN Doc. A/C.1/50/PV.8, 20 October 1995, p. 5.
At the First Conference of States Parties to the Chemical Weapons Convention in 1997, Israel stated that, although it had not yet ratified the Convention because virtually none of its Arab neighbours had done so, it was nonetheless “strongly committed to the fundamental goal of the Convention, that is, the total elimination of the scourge of chemical weapons from the face of the earth”. 
Israel, Statement at the First Conference of States Parties to the Chemical Weapons Convention, The Hague, 6–23 May 1997.