Related Rule
Israel
Practice Relating to Rule 53. Starvation as a Method of Warfare
Israel’s Manual on the Laws of War (1998) states that conducting a scorched earth policy “with a view to inflicting starvation or suffering on the civilian population … is forbidden”. 
Israel, Laws of War in the Battlefield, Manual, Military Advocate General Headquarters, Military School, 1998, p. 35.
Israel’s Manual on the Rules of Warfare (2006) states:
War must not be waged by means of a “scorched earth” policy, that is to say intentional attack on food products, farmland, sanitation facilities etc., at such a level as would lead to the starvation of the civilian population. 
Israel, Rules of Warfare on the Battlefield, Military Advocate-General’s Corps Command, IDF School of Military Law, Second Edition, 2006, p. 25.
The Manual on the Rules of Warfare (2006) is a second edition of the Manual on the Laws of War (1998).
In its judgment in the Eichmann case in 1961, the District Court of Jerusalem held that starvation caused serious bodily or mental harm and, therefore, amounted to a violation of Israel’s Crime of Genocide (Prevention and Punishment) Law. 
Israel, District Court of Jerusalem, Eichmann case, Judgment, 12 December 1961.
In its judgment in the Albasyouni case in 2008, concerning a petition regarding the Israeli Government’s decision to reduce or limit the supply of fuel and electricity to the Gaza Strip, Israel’s High Court of Justice stated:
13. … Finally, the Respondents referred in their brief also to Article 54 of the First Protocol [1977 Additional Protocol I], which prohibits the starvation of a civilian population as a means of warfare …
22. … [T]he State of Israel is required to act against the terrorist organizations within the framework of the law and in accordance with the dictates of international law, and to refrain from deliberately harming the civilian population located in the Gaza Strip. 
Israel, High Court of Justice, Albasyouni case, Judgment, 30 January 2008, §§ 13 and 22.
According to the Report on the Practice of Israel, “the IDF [Israel Defense Forces] does not condone or practice starvation of the civilian population as a method of warfare”. 
Report on the Practice of Israel, 1997, Chapter 4.1.
Israel’s Manual on the Laws of War (1998) states:
Siege as a method of warfare vis-a-vis a military objective is an absolutely legal method even if it involves the starvation of the besieged or preventing the transfer of medications in order to achieve surrender.
A question arises in the case of a military siege of an inhabited city. Until recently there were no rules relating to this method of warfare, and it was allowed to exploit the suffering of the local population in order to subdue the enemy. Following the Second World War, a provision was set in the Additional Protocols of 1977, forbidding the starvation of a civilian population in war. This provision clearly implies that the city’s inhabitants must be allowed to leave the city during a siege. 
Israel, Laws of War in the Battlefield, Manual, Military Advocate General Headquarters, Military School, 1998, p. 59.
Israel’s Manual on the Rules of Warfare (2006) states:
A siege of a military target is a completely legitimate means of warfare, even if it involves the starvation of the besieged soldiers. A question arises in the case of a military siege of a populated town. Until recently, there were no rules attached to this method of warfare, and it was permitted to exploit the suffering of the local population in order to overcome the enemy. The [1977] Additional Protocols to the Geneva Convention contain a provision banning starvation of the civilian population in battle. The meaning to be extracted from this provision is that the residents of a city need to be allowed to leave it if it is besieged. In cases where civilians do not have the opportunity to leave the besieged city, a duty arises to supply them with food, water and humanitarian aid. 
Israel, Rules of Warfare on the Battlefield, Military Advocate-General’s Corps Command, IDF School of Military Law, Second Edition, 2006, p. 37.
The Manual on the Rules of Warfare (2006) is a second edition of the Manual on the Laws of War (1998).