Israel
Practice Relating to the Prohibition of Certain Types of Landmines
Israel’s Manual on the Laws of War (1998) underlines the existence of “a wide international movement … with a view to bring about an absolute prohibition of the use of anti-personnel mines”. It states: “Israel has not joined the Convention, just as the Arab states have not. Nevertheless Israel has declared a moratorium on the manufacture and export of anti-personnel mines.” 
Israel, Laws of War in the Battlefield, Manual, Military Advocate General Headquarters, Military School, 1998, pp. 13–14.
Israel’s Manual on the Rules of Warfare (2006) states: “There is a trend currently to outlaw anti-personnel mines due to the major damage caused accidentally to the civilian population.” 
Israel, Rules of Warfare on the Battlefield, Military Advocate-General’s Corps Command, IDF School of Military Law, Second Edition, 2006, p. 15.
The manual further states:
Israel and the Arab countries have not signed the Convention, although in 1994 Israel declared a moratorium (a voluntary cessation) on the manufacture and export of anti-personnel mines for a three-year period, and has extended it. 
Israel, Rules of Warfare on the Battlefield, Military Advocate-General’s Corps Command, IDF School of Military Law, Second Edition, 2006, p. 15.
The Manual on the Rules of Warfare (2006) is a second edition of the Manual on the Laws of War (1998).
At the First Meeting of the States Parties to the Ottawa Convention in 1999, Israel, attending the meeting as an observer, stated that it “whole-heartedly supports the ultimate goal of this Convention” and that it
supports a gradual process in which each state will begin doing its part to reduce the indiscriminate use of landmines, toward the eventual goal of a total ban … The first step should be the elimination of the production of [anti-personnel landmines] to be followed by finding appropriate replacements for landmines and then, later on, when security circumstances allow, a total ban on the use of [anti-personnel landmines]. 
Israel, Statement at the First Meeting of the States Parties to the Ottawa Convention, Maputo, 3–7 May 1999.
In 2001, during a debate in the First Committee of the UN General Assembly, Israel stated:
Israel supports the ultimate humanitarian goal of the Convention on the Prohibition of the Use, Stockpiling, Production and Transfer of Anti-personnel Mines and on Their Destruction, aimed at eliminating the consequences of indiscriminate use of anti-personnel landmines … [Israel] is still required to resort to defensive operations against terrorists in order to prevent attacks on its civilians. Therefore, we remain at present unable to support an immediate enactment of a total ban on landmines. 
Israel, Statement before the First Committee of the UN General Assembly, UN Doc. A/C.1/ 56/PV.19, 31 October 2001, p. 6.