Related Rule
Ireland
Practice Relating to Rule 99. Deprivation of Liberty
Ireland’s Geneva Conventions Act (1962), as amended in 1998, provides that grave breaches of the 1949 Geneva Conventions are punishable offences. 
Ireland, Geneva Conventions Act, 1962, as amended in 1998, Section 3(1).
In 2008, in a written response to a question on human rights issues, Ireland’s Minister for Foreign Affairs stated:
[T]he Government is completely opposed to the practice of the extraordinary rendition of prisoners.
The Committee [Cabinet Committee on Aspects of International Human Rights] has agreed that early contact should be made with the new US Administration to seek a clear statement of intent that extraordinary rendition would cease and would not resume during the new President’s term of office. … [W]hat we are looking for is a clear overall policy statement which would commit the new Administration to end the practice of extraordinary rendition wherever it may be occurring. 
Ireland, Dáil Eireann (House of Deputies), Minister for Foreign Affairs, Written Answers—Human Rights Issues (2), Dáil Eireann debate Vol. 666 No. 3, 11 November 2008.
In 2008, in a written response to a question on foreign conflicts, Ireland’s Minister for Foreign Affairs stated:
As regards the call in the petition “for the immediate release of 38 elected Palestinian parliamentarians held in Israeli jails”, it is understood that this refers to 37 members of the Palestinian Legislative Council who are imprisoned in Israel. … I would call for the release of all prisoners who have not been subject to due judicial process. 
Ireland, Dáil Eireann (House of Deputies), Minister for Foreign Affairs, Written Answers—Foreign Conflicts (2), Dáil Eireann debate Vol. 669 No. 2, 2 December 2008.
In 2009, in a written response to a question on human rights issues, Ireland’s Minister for Foreign Affairs stated:
In our bilateral contacts with both Israel and the Palestinian authorities, the Government regularly raises human rights issues, including the implications of respective Israeli and Palestinian security policies, and the importance of full compliance with international humanitarian law. In particular, Ireland and the EU have serious concerns about the practice of administrative detention, whereby Israel holds Palestinians indefinitely without charge or trial. Ireland has been to the fore in ensuring that these concerns are addressed in the EU’s political contacts with Israel. 
Ireland, Dáil Eireann (House of Deputies), Minister for Foreign Affairs, Written Answers—Human Rights Issues, Dáil Eireann debate Vol. 689 No. 2, 17 September 2009.
Ireland’s Geneva Conventions Act (1962), as amended in 1998, provides that any “minor breach” of the 1949 Geneva Conventions, including violations of Article 78 of the Geneva Convention IV, is a punishable offence. 
Ireland, Geneva Conventions Act, 1962, as amended in 1998, Section 4(1) and (4).
Ireland’s Geneva Conventions Act (1962), as amended in 1998, provides that any “minor breach” of the 1977 Additional Protocol I, including violations of Article 75(3), is a punishable offence. 
Ireland, Geneva Conventions Act, 1962, as amended in 1998, Section 4(1) and (4).
Ireland’s Geneva Conventions Act (1962), as amended in 1998, provides that any “minor breach” of the 1949 Geneva Conventions, including violations of Articles 43 and 78 of the Geneva Convention IV, is a punishable offence. 
Ireland, Geneva Conventions Act, 1962, as amended in 1998, Section 4(1) and (4).