Related Rule
Ireland
Practice Relating to Rule 90. Torture and Cruel, Inhuman or Degrading Treatment
Ireland’s Basic LOAC Guide (2005) states: “The following acts are specified as grave breaches under the convention for the treatment of PWs [prisoners of war] [1949 Geneva Convention III]: - … torture or inhumane treatment; [and] wilfully causing great suffering or serious injury to body or health”. 
Ireland, Basic Guide to the Law of Armed Conflict, TP/TRG/01-2005, Director of Defence Forces Training, Department of Defence, July 2005, p. 10.
The manual further states that “torture or inhumane treatment; [and] wilfully causing great suffering or serious injury to body or health” are grave breaches of the 1949 Geneva Convention IV relating to the treatment of civilians. 
Ireland, Basic Guide to the Law of Armed Conflict, TP/TRG/01-2005, Director of Defence Forces Training, Department of Defence, July 2005, p. 12.
The manual also provides a list of “Soldiers Rules”, one of which is: “Do not torture … or abuse prisoners of war.” 
Ireland, Basic Guide to the Law of Armed Conflict, TP/TRG/01-2005, Director of Defence Forces Training, Department of Defence, July 2005, p. 13.
Ireland’s Geneva Conventions Act (1962), as amended in 1998, provides that grave breaches of the 1949 Geneva Conventions are punishable offences. 
Ireland, Geneva Conventions Act, 1962, as amended in 1998, Section 3(1).
In addition, any “minor breach” of the 1949 Geneva Conventions, including violations of common Article 3, Article 12 of the Geneva Convention I, Article 12 of the Geneva Convention II, Articles 17, 87 and 89 of the Geneva Convention III, and Article 32 of the Geneva Convention IV, and of the 1977 Additional Protocol I, including violations of Article 75(2), as well as any “contravention” of the 1977 Additional Protocol II, including violations of Article 4(2), are punishable offences. 
Ireland, Geneva Conventions Act, 1962, as amended in 1998, Section 4(1) and (4).
In 2008, in a written response to a question on human rights issues, Ireland’s Minister for Foreign Affairs stated:
[US] [c]ommitments are also being sought in regard to the closure of Guantanamo Bay and to the prohibition of intensive interrogation techniques, such as water-boarding, that are internationally considered to constitute torture. These techniques are in clear violation of international human rights and humanitarian law. The closure of Guantanamo Bay has been called for by the Government consistently and from an early point and is now the agreed position of the EU. 
Ireland, Dáil Eireann (House of Deputies), Minister for Foreign Affairs, Written Answers –Human Rights Issues (2), Dáil Eireann debate Vol. 666 No. 3, 11 November 2008.
In 2009, in its initial report to the Committee against Torture, Ireland stated:
Irish law does not allow any justification for the use of torture. The Criminal Justice (United Nations Convention against Torture) Act 2000 Act does not provide for a defence in exceptional circumstances such as a state of war or a threat of war, internal political instability or any other public emergency. Ireland, in enacting the Act has given effect to the prohibition of the practice of torture. 
Ireland, Initial report to the Committee against Torture, 26 January 2010, UN Doc CAT/C/IRL/1, submitted 31 July 2009, § 97.