Related Rule
Ireland
Practice Relating to Rule 87. Humane Treatment
Ireland’s Geneva Conventions Act (1962), as amended in 1998, provides that any “minor breach” of the 1949 Geneva Conventions, including violations of common Article 3, and of the 1977 Additional Protocol I, including violations of Article 75(1), as well as any “contravention” of the 1977 Additional Protocol II, including violations of Article 4(1), are punishable offences. 
Ireland, Geneva Conventions Act, 1962, as amended in 1998, Section 4(1) and (4).
Ireland’s Basic LOAC Guide (2005) states: “Civilians are always entitled to respect for their persons, honour, family rights, religious convictions and practices, and their manners and customs. They must always be treated humanely and protected from acts of violence.” 
Ireland, Basic Guide to the Law of Armed Conflict, TP/TRG/01-2005, Director of Defence Forces Training, Department of Defence, July 2005, p. 10.
The manual also provides a list of “Soldiers Rules”, one of which is: “Treat all civilians humanely.” 
Ireland, Basic Guide to the Law of Armed Conflict, TP/TRG/01-2005, Director of Defence Forces Training, Department of Defence, July 2005, p. 13.
Ireland’s Geneva Conventions Act (1962), as amended in 1998, provides that any “minor breach” of the 1949 Geneva Conventions, including violations of Articles 5 and 27 of the 1949 Geneva Convention IV, is a punishable offence. 
Ireland, Geneva Conventions Act, 1962, as amended in 1998, Section 4(1) and (4).
Ireland’s Basic LOAC Guide (2005) states:
All wounded and sick, regardless of the party to which they belong, shall be respected and protected. In all circumstances, they shall be treated humanely and shall receive, to the fullest possible extent and with the least possible delay, the medical care and attention required by their condition. 
Ireland, Basic Guide to the Law of Armed Conflict, TP/TRG/01-2005, Director of Defence Forces Training, Department of Defence, July 2005, p. 6.
[emphasis in original]
Ireland’s Geneva Conventions Act (1962), as amended in 1998, provides that any “minor breach” of the 1949 Geneva Conventions, including violations of Article 12 of Geneva Convention I and Article 12 of Geneva Convention II, and of the 1977 Additional Protocol I, including violations of Article 10, as well as any “contravention” of the 1977 Additional Protocol II, including violations of Article 7, are punishable offences. 
Ireland, Geneva Conventions Act, 1962, as amended in 1998, Section 4(1) and (4).
Ireland’s Basic LOAC Guide (2005) states:
When PWs [prisoners of war] are taken, they are prisoners of the Detaining Power, not of the personnel who have captured them. The Detaining Power is responsible for seeing that they are properly treated. PWs must be humanely treated at all times. They must be protected, particularly against violence, intimidation, insults and public curiosity.
Respect for a PW’s person and honour must be given at all times. All PWs retain the legal rights they had before capture and the right to exercise them so far as is consistent with their captivity. As stated previously, their status is in no sense that of persons convicted of a crime. 
Ireland, Basic Guide to the Law of Armed Conflict, TP/TRG/01-2005, Director of Defence Forces Training, Department of Defence, July 2005, p. 8.
The manual also provides a list of “Soldiers Rules”, one of which is: “Do not … abuse prisoners of war.” 
Ireland, Basic Guide to the Law of Armed Conflict, TP/TRG/01-2005, Director of Defence Forces Training, Department of Defence, July 2005, p. 13.
Ireland’s Geneva Conventions Act (1962), as amended in 1998, provides that any “minor breach” of the 1949 Geneva Conventions, including violations of Article 13 of Geneva Convention III and Article 27 of Geneva Convention IV, as well as any “contravention” of the 1977 Additional Protocol II, including violations of Article 5(3), are punishable offences. 
Ireland, Geneva Conventions Act, 1962, as amended in 1998, Section 4(1) and (4).