Related Rule
Ireland
Practice Relating to Rule 158. Prosecution of War Crimes
Ireland’s Geneva Conventions Act (1962), as amended in 1998, provides:
Any person, whatever his or her nationality, who, whether in or outside the State, commits or aids, abets or procures the commission by any other person of a grave breach of any of the [1949 Geneva] Conventions or [the 1977 Additional Protocol I] shall be guilty of an offence and on conviction on indictment [be liable to punishment]. 
Ireland, Geneva Conventions Act, 1962, as amended in 1998, Section 3.
The Act also provides for the punishment of “minor breaches” of the 1949 Geneva Conventions and the 1977 Additional Protocols in the following terms:
Any person, whatever his nationality, who, in the State, commits, or aids, or abets or procures the commission in the State by any other person of any other minor breach of any of the [1949 Geneva] Conventions or of [the 1977 Additional Protocol I] or [the 1977 Additional Protocol II] shall be guilty of an offence.
Any person, whatever his nationality, who, outside the State, commits, or aids, or abets or procures the commission outside the State by any other person of any other minor breach of any of the [1949 Geneva] Conventions or of [the 1977 Additional Protocol I] or [the 1977 Additional Protocol II] shall be guilty of an offence.
Any person who is guilty of an offence under this section shall be liable [to punishment]. 
Ireland, Geneva Conventions Act, 1962, as amended in 1998, Section 4.
Ireland’s International Criminal Court Act (2006) states: “Any person who commits … a war crime is guilty of an offence.” 
Ireland, International Criminal Court Act, 2006, § 7(1).
In 2009, Ireland’s Minister for Foreign Affairs, in a written response to a question on foreign conflicts, stated:
The recent conflict in Gaza witnessed a number of appalling incidents and alleged violations of international humanitarian law by both parties. I have called on several occasions – including at the General Affairs and External Relations Council meeting in Brussels on 26 January – for these incidents to be fully investigated and, where evidence of violations of international humanitarian law is adduced, for those responsible be held to account.
I note that the Israeli Government is investigating the very serious allegations against its Defence Forces. At a minimum, these investigations require the involvement of independent international experts if they are to have any credibility. …
It remains desirable that there should also be an international investigation into some of the most serious incidents of the Gaza conflict, as this represents the most effective way to ensure impartiality and transparency. 
Ireland, Dáil Eireann (House of Deputies), Minister for Foreign Affairs, Written Answers – Foreign Conflicts, Dáil Eireann debate Vol. 674 No. 4, 17 February 2009.