Related Rule
Greece
Practice Relating to Rule 160. Statutes of Limitation
In 1967, during a debate in the Third Committee of the UN General Assembly on the question of the punishment of war criminals and of persons who have committed crimes against humanity, the representative of Greece stated:
12. … The non-applicability of statutory limitation to [war crimes and crimes against humanity] was said to be a principle of international law which the [preliminary draft convention on the non-applicability of statutory limitations to war crimes and crimes against humanity] only affirmed. Hence the subtitle of article I of the draft convention: “Affirmation of the principle of the non-applicability of statutory limitation to war crimes and crimes against humanity”. What was actually involved, in her delegation’s opinion, was a new legal concept …
15. … The convention before the Committee did not meet current needs: society no longer felt the same resentment towards crimes committed twenty or thirty years ago, and the criminals who had committed those crimes were no longer the same men. They should therefore have the benefit of statutory limitation, particularly since limitation statutes applying to crimes committed in time of peace extended to even the most hideous crimes …
19. It was thus inadvisable to exclude war crimes from statutory limitation. 
Greece, Statement before the Third Committee of the UN General Assembly, UN Doc. A/C.3/SR.1515, 15 November 1967, §§ 12–19.
In a later meeting on the same issue in 1967, Greece stated:
The draft convention before the Committee [on the non-applicability of statutory limitations to war crimes and crimes against humanity] was intended to establish a new principle, the non-applicability of statutory limitation to war crimes and crimes against humanity. 
Greece, Statement before the Third Committee of the UN General Assembly, UN Doc. A/C.3/SR.1547, 12 December 1967, § 5.