Related Rule
France
Practice Relating to Rule 92. Mutilation and Medical, Scientific or Biological Experiments
France’s Disciplinary Regulations (1975) as amended provides that soldiers in combat are prohibited to subject the wounded, sick and shipwrecked, prisoners and civilians to mutilations. 
France, Règlement de Discipline Générale dans les Armées, Decree No. 75-675 of 28 July 1975, replacing Decree No. 66-749, completed by Decree of 11 October 1978, implemented by Instruction No. 52000/DEF/C/5 of 10 December 1979, and modified by Decree of 12 July 1982, Ministère de la Défense, Etat-Major de l’Armée de Terre, Bureau Emploi, Article 9 bis (2).
France’s LOAC Summary Note (1992) provides that biological experiments are war crimes under the law of armed conflicts. 
France, Fiche de Synthèse sur les Règles Applicables dans les Conflits Armés, Note No. 432/DEF/EMA/OL.2/NP, Général de Corps d’Armée Voinot (pour l’Amiral Lanxade, Chef d’Etat-major des Armées), 1992, § 3.4.
France’s LOAC Manual (2001) provides that mutilation is a war crime. 
France, Manuel de droit des conflits armés, Ministère de la Défense, Direction des Affaires Juridiques, Sous-Direction du droit international humanitaire et du droit européen, Bureau du droit des conflits armés, 2001, p. 45.
France’s Penal Code (1992), as amended in 2010, states in its section on war crimes common to both international and non-international armed conflicts:
Subjecting persons from another party to the conflict to mutilations and medical or scientific experiments which are neither justified for therapeutic reasons nor carried out in the interest of these persons, and which cause death or serious injury to their health or physical or mental integrity, is punishable by life imprisonment. 
France, Penal Code, 1992, as amended in 2010, Article 461-3.