Related Rule
France
Practice Relating to Rule 65. Perfidy
Section A. General
France’s LOAC Summary Note (1992) prohibits perfidy. It does not define “perfidy” as such, but states: “It is forbidden to feign a protected status to invite the confidence of the enemy.” 
France, Fiche de Synthèse sur les Règles Applicables dans les Conflits Armés, Note No. 432/DEF/EMA/OL.2/NP, Général de Corps d’Armée Voinot (pour l’Amiral Lanxade, Chef d’Etat-major des Armées), 1992, § 4.4.
France’s LOAC Teaching Note (2000) prohibits the recourse to perfidy. 
France, Fiche didactique relative au droit des conflits armés, Directive of the Ministry of Defence, 4 January 2000, annexed to the Directive No. 147 of the Ministry of Defence of 4 January 2000, p. 3.
France’s LOAC Manual (2001) states:
Contrary to ruses of war, treachery is prohibited by the law of armed conflicts when it leads to the use of perfidious means, i.e. inviting the good faith of the adversary to lead him to believe that he is entitled to receive, or the obligation to accord, the protection provided for by the law of armed conflict. 
France, Manuel de droit des conflits armés, Ministère de la Défense, Direction des Affaires Juridiques, Sous-Direction du droit international humanitaire et du droit européen, Bureau du droit des conflits armés, 2001, p. 123.
The manual considers that perfidy is a prohibited method of warfare. 
France, Manuel de droit des conflits armés, Ministère de la Défense, Direction des Affaires Juridiques, Sous-Direction du droit international humanitaire et du droit européen, Bureau du droit des conflits armés, 2001, p. 85.
It also incorporates the definition of perfidy contained in Article 37 of the 1977 Additional Protocol I. 
France, Manuel de droit des conflits armés, Ministère de la Défense, Direction des Affaires Juridiques, Sous-Direction du droit international humanitaire et du droit européen, Bureau du droit des conflits armés, 2001, p. 123; see also p. 93.
The manual also states: “There are two elements which constitute perfidy: a fraudulent intention to kill, injure or capture an enemy, and a will to invite his good faith. When a perfidious act causes the death or serious physical injury to the adversary, it constitutes a war crime.” 
France, Manuel de droit des conflits armés, Ministère de la Défense, Direction des Affaires Juridiques, Sous-Direction du droit international humanitaire et du droit européen, Bureau du droit des conflits armés, 2001, p. 94; see also p. 85.