Related Rule
Ethiopia
Practice Relating to Rule 155. Defence of Superior Orders
Ethiopia’s Penal Code (1957) provides:
The subordinate who has carried out an order to commit an offence … shall be liable to punishment if he was aware of the illegal nature of the order or knew that the order was given without authority or knew the criminal nature of the act ordered, such as in cases of homicide, arson or any other grave offence against persons or property, essential public interests or international law.
The Court may, without restriction, reduce the penalty when the person who performed the act ordered was moved by a sense of duty dictated by discipline or obedience; the Court shall take into account the compelling nature of the duty.
The Court may impose no punishment where, having regard to all the circumstances and in particular to the stringent exigencies of State or military discipline, the person concerned could not discuss the order received and act otherwise than he did. 
Ethiopia, Penal Code, 1957, Article 70.
Ethiopia’s Criminal Code (2004) states:
Article 74.- Responsibility of the Subordinate.
(1) The subordinate shall be liable to punishment if he was aware of the illegal nature of the order, in particular if he knew that the order was given without authority or knew the criminal nature of the act ordered, such as in cases of homicide, arson or any other grave crime against persons, or national security or property, essential public interests or international law.
(2) The Court may, without restriction, reduce the penalty when the person who performed the act ordered was moved by a sense of duty dictated by discipline or obedience; in particular where the duty is of a compelling nature the Court shall reduce the penalty without restriction (Art. 180).
The Court may impose no punishment where, having regard to all the circumstances and in particular to the stringent exigencies of State or military discipline, the person concerned could not discuss the order received and act otherwise than he did. 
Ethiopia, Criminal Code, 2004, Articles 74(1)–(2).
The Criminal Code of 2004 repealed Ethiopia’s Penal Code (1957).
In 1994, in a statement before the UN Commission on Human Rights, the Chief Special Prosecutor of the Ethiopian Transitional Government stated: “The Ethiopian Government … was aware that democracy could not allow criminals to go unpunished on the pretext that they had acted on government orders.” 
Ethiopia, Transitional Government, Chief Special Prosecutor, Statement before the UN Commission on Human Rights, 17 February 1994, UN Doc. E/CN.4/1994/SR.28, 22 January 1996, § 3.