Related Rule
Ecuador
Practice Relating to Rule 65. Perfidy
Ecuador’s Naval Manual (1989) states:
The use of unlawful deceptions is called “perfidy”. Acts of perfidy are deceptions designed to invite the confidence of the enemy to lead him to believe that he is entitled to, or is obliged to accord, protected status under the law of armed conflict, with the intent to betray that confidence. 
Ecuador, Aspectos Importantes del Derecho Internacional Marítimo que Deben Tener Presente los Comandantes de los Buques, Academia de Guerra Naval, 1989, § 12.1.2.
Ecuador’s Naval Manual (1989) states:
It is a violation of the law of armed conflict to kill, injure or capture the enemy … by feigning shipwreck, sickness, [or] wounds … A surprise attack by a person feigning shipwreck, sickness, or wounds undermines the protected status of those rendered incapable of combat … Such acts of perfidy are punishable war crimes. 
Ecuador, Aspectos Importantes del Derecho Internacional Marítimo que Deben Tener Presente los Comandantes de los Buques, Academia de Guerra Naval, 1989, § 12.7.
Ecuador’s Naval Manual (1989) states: “Feigning surrender in order to lure the enemy into a trap is an act of perfidy.” 
Ecuador, Aspectos Importantes del Derecho Internacional Marítimo que Deben Tener Presente los Comandantes de los Buques, Academia de Guerra Naval, 1989, § 12.1.2.
The manual adds: “It is a violation of the law of armed conflict to kill, injure, or capture the enemy by false indication of an intent to surrender … Such [act] of perfidy [is a] punishable war [crime].” 
Ecuador, Aspectos Importantes del Derecho Internacional Marítimo que Deben Tener Presente los Comandantes de los Buques, Academia de Guerra Naval, 1989, § 12.7.
In addition, the manual states: “The following acts constitute war crimes: … treacherous request for quarter (for example, feigning surrender in order to gain a military advantage)”. 
Ecuador, Aspectos Importantes del Derecho Internacional Marítimo que Deben Tener Presente los Comandantes de los Buques, Academia de Guerra Naval, 1989, § 6.2.5(12).
Ecuador’s Naval Manual (1989) provides that it is unlawful to use the flag of truce to gain a military advantage over the enemy. It adds: “Misuse of protective signs, signals and symbols … in order to injure, kill, or capture the enemy constitutes an act of perfidy.” 
Ecuador, Aspectos Importantes del Derecho Internacional Marítimo que Deben Tener Presente los Comandantes de los Buques, Academia de Guerra Naval, 1989, § 12.2.
Ecuador’s Naval Manual (1989) states:
Misuse of protective signs, signals, and symbols … in order to injure, kill, or capture the enemy constitutes an act of perfidy. Such acts are prohibited because they undermine the effectiveness of protective signs, signals, and symbols and thereby jeopardize the safety of non-combatants and the immunity of protected structures and activities. For example, using an ambulance or medical aircraft marked with the red cross or red crescent to carry armed combatants, weapons, or ammunition with which to attack or elude enemy forces is prohibited. 
Ecuador, Aspectos Importantes del Derecho Internacional Marítimo que Deben Tener Presente los Comandantes de los Buques, Academia de Guerra Naval, 1989, § 12.2.
Ecuador’s Naval Manual (1989) states: “Misuse of protective signs, signals and symbols in order to injure, kill, or capture the enemy constitutes an act of perfidy.” 
Ecuador, Aspectos Importantes del Derecho Internacional Marítimo que Deben Tener Presente los Comandantes de los Buques, Academia de Guerra Naval, 1989, § 12.2.
Ecuador’s Naval Manual (1989) states that illegal combatants may be denied prisoner-of-war status, tried and punished. It also states: “It is a violation of the law of armed conflict to kill, injure, or capture the enemy by false indication of … civilian status … Attacking enemy forces while posing as a civilian puts all civilians at hazard. Such acts of perfidy are punishable as war crimes.” 
Ecuador, Aspectos Importantes del Derecho Internacional Marítimo que Deben Tener Presente los Comandantes de los Buques, Academia de Guerra Naval, 1989, §§ 12.7 and 12.7.1.