Related Rule
Ecuador
Practice Relating to Rule 1. The Principle of Distinction between Civilians and Combatants
Ecuador’s Naval Manual (1989) states: “The law of armed conflicts is based largely on the distinction to be made between combatants and noncombatants.” 
Ecuador, Aspectos Importantes del Derecho Internacional Marítimo que Deben Tener Presente los Comandantes de los Buques, Academia de Guerra Naval, 1989, § 5.3; see also §§ 8.1 and 11.1.
In its written statement submitted to the ICJ in the Nuclear Weapons case in 1995, Ecuador stated: “The use of nuclear weapons does not discriminate, in general, military objectives from civilian objectives.” 
Ecuador, Written statement submitted to the ICJ, Nuclear Weapons case, 20 June 1995, § D.
Ecuador’s Naval Manual (1989) states that only attacks against combatants and other military objectives are lawful. 
Ecuador, Aspectos Importantes del Derecho Internacional Marítimo que Deben Tener Presente los Comandantes de los Buques, Academia de Guerra Naval, 1989, § 8.1.
Ecuador’s Naval Manual (1989) states: “Civilians and civilian objects may not be made the object of attack.” 
Ecuador, Aspectos Importantes del Derecho Internacional Marítimo que Deben Tener Presente los Comandantes de los Buques, Academia de Guerra Naval, 1989, § 8.1.2; see also §§ 11.2 and 11.3.
The manual further states that “bombardment for the sole purpose of attacking and terrorizing the civilian population” constitutes a war crime. 
Ecuador, Aspectos Importantes del Derecho Internacional Marítimo que Deben Tener Presente los Comandantes de los Buques, Academia de Guerra Naval, 1989, § 6.2.5.