Related Rule
Germany
Practice Relating to Rule 83. Removal or Neutralization of Landmines
Germany’s Military Manual (1992) states:
The location of minefields [and] mines … shall be recorded: the parties to the conflict shall retain these records and, whenever possible, by mutual agreement, provide for their publication (Weapons Conv., Prot. 2, Art. 7). In the Federal Armed Force the territorial command authorities are responsible for the mining documentation.
The manual adds:
After the cessation of an international armed conflict, the parties to the conflict shall, both among themselves and, where appropriate, with other states or international organizations, exchange information and technical assistance necessary to remove or otherwise render ineffective minefields [and] mines. 
Germany, Humanitarian Law in Armed Conflicts – Manual, DSK VV207320067, edited by The Federal Ministry of Defence of the Federal Republic of Germany, VR II 3, August 1992, English translation of ZDv 15/2, Humanitäres Völkerrecht in bewaffneten KonfliktenHandbuch, August 1992, §§ 417 and 419.
With respect to remotely delivered mines, the manual, quoting Article 5(1) of the 1980 Protocol II to the Convention on Certain Conventional Weapons, provides: “After emplacement their location shall be accurately recorded.” 
Germany, Humanitarian Law in Armed Conflicts – Manual, DSK VV207320067, edited by The Federal Ministry of Defence of the Federal Republic of Germany, VR II 3, August 1992, English translation of ZDv 15/2, Humanitäres Völkerrecht in bewaffneten KonfliktenHandbuch, August 1992, § 413.
In 2004, in its Annual Disarmament Report 2003, Germany’s Federal Government reported to the Bundestag (Lower House of Parliament):
The Ottawa Convention is the central treaty body on the worldwide ban on anti-personnel mines (APM) and since its coming into force on 1 March 1999 a milestone of international humanitarian law.
Apart from its commitment to the worldwide ban on anti-personnel mines, the Federal Government has also given increased assistance in mine and ordnance clearance … In 2003, the Federal Government overall made 17.4 million euros available to projects. Concrete mine and ordnance clearance is given prominence, other measures concern information of the population, training of local mine clearers, establishing of national structures for mine clearing, technical equipment and provision of care for victims. An important aim of the Federal Government regarding these projects is the promotion of modern mine clearance procedures adapted to the local circumstances. 
Germany, Federal Government, Annual Disarmament Report 2003, 14 May 2004, pp. 51–52.
In 2005, its Annual Disarmament Report 2004, Germany’s Federal Government reported to the Bundestag (Lower House of Parliament):
The Ottawa Convention is the central treaty body on the worldwide ban on anti-personnel mines (APM) and since its coming into force on 1 March 1999 a milestone of international humanitarian law.
As part of its commitment to the worldwide ban on anti-personnel mines, the Federal Government also gives assistance in mine and ordnance clearing … In 2004, the Federal Government overall made 16 million euros available to bilateral projects … Mine and ordnance clearance by means of modern procedures adapted to the local circumstances are given prominence; other measures concern information of the population, training of local mine clearers, establishing of national structures for mine clearing, technical equipment and provision of care for victims. 
Germany, Federal Government, Annual Disarmament Report 2004, 17 June 2005, pp. 53–54.
In 2006, in its Annual Disarmament Report 2005, Germany’s Federal Government reported to the Bundestag (Lower House of Parliament):
The Ottawa Convention is the central treaty body on the worldwide ban on anti-personnel mines (APM) and since its coming into force on 1 March 1999 a milestone of international humanitarian law.
As part of its commitment to the worldwide ban on anti-personnel mines, the Federal Government gives assistance in mine and ordnance clearance, in particular where mines and unexploded ordnance are a pressing humanitarian problem. To this purpose, approximately 154 million euros were spent in 36 countries since 1992. In 2005, the Federal Government overall made 17,5 million euros available to bilateral projects … To be added is the German contribution of almost 24 percent to the payments of the EU Commission, which in 2004 came to approximately 58 million euros. The European Union (member States and Commission together) is worldwide the biggest donor in the area of humanitarian mine clearance. Apart from mine and ordnance clearance, assistance includes measures to inform populations threatened by mines, support of national mine clearance institutions, training of local mine clearance staff, as well as care for victims in affected populations. 
Germany, Federal Government, Annual Disarmament Report 2005, 12 May 2006, p. 49.
In 2006, in its report on the cooperation between the Federal Republic of Germany and the United Nations in the years 2004 and 2005, Germany’s Federal Government reported to the Bundestag (Lower House of Parliament):
11. Ottawa Convention on the global ban on anti-personnel mines
… As an element of its dedication to the worldwide ban on anti-personnel mines the Federal Government gives assistance to mine and ordnance clearance, in particular where they are a pressing humanitarian problem (see: Humanitarian Demining).
2.3. Humanitarian Demining
Since the mid-90s, the Federal Government has promoted the ban on anti-personnel mines on the political level and had a leading role in the development and implementation of the Ottawa Convention. In parallel to that, the funds spent on humanitarian mine and ordnance clearance have been considerably increased. In 2005, the Federal Government provided 16.6 million euros for mine and unexploded ordnance clearance, for victim support and for information on the dangers of mines. 
Germany, Federal Government, Report on the Cooperation between the Federal Republic of Germany and the United Nations in the Years 2004 and 2005, 7 December 2006, pp. 18 and 39.
In 2007, in its Annual Disarmament Report 2006, Germany’s Federal Government reported to the Bundestag (Lower House of Parliament):
The Ottawa Convention is the decisive treaty body on the worldwide ban on anti-personnel mines (APM) and therefore since its coming into force on 1 March 1999 a milestone of international humanitarian law.
As part of its commitment to the worldwide ban on anti-personnel mines, the Federal Government gives assistance in mine and ordnance clearance, in particular where mines and unexploded ordnance are a pressing humanitarian problem. To this purpose, approximately 154 million euros were spent in 36 countries since 1992. In 2006, the Federal Government overall made 15,27 million euros available to bilateral projects … To be added is the German contribution of almost 24 percent to the payments of the EU Commission, which in 2005 [came to] approximately 58 million euros.
The European Union (member States and Commission together) is worldwide the biggest donor in the area of humanitarian mine clearance. Apart from mine and ordnance clearance, assistance includes measures to inform populations threatened by mines, support of national mine clearance institutions, training of local mine clearance staff, as well as care for victims in affected populations. 
Germany, Federal Government, Annual Disarmament Report 2006, 27 April 2007, pp. 28–29.
In 2009, in its Annual Disarmament Report 2008, submitted to the Bundestag (Lower House of Parliament), Germany’s Federal Government stated:
The [1997] Ottawa Convention is the decisive treaty body on the worldwide ban on anti-personnel mines and therefore since its coming into force on 1 March 1999 a milestone of international humanitarian law.
As part of its commitment for a worldwide ban on anti-personnel mines, Germany assists in the removal of mines and other means of warfare, in particular in areas where mines and unexploded ordinances are a pressing humanitarian problem. To this purpose, approximately 170 million euros have been spent in 42 countries since 1992. … To be added is the German contribution of approximately 20 percent to the payments of the EU Commission.
The European Union (member States and Commission) is worldwide the biggest donor in the area of humanitarian mine clearance. Since 1997 it has spent more than 1.5 billion euros on the clearance of mines and means of warfare, supporting national mine clearance institutions, training of local mine clearance staff, as well as care for victims in affected populations. 
Germany, Federal Government, Annual Disarmament Report 2008, 21 January 2009, pp. 22–23.
In 2010, in its Annual Disarmament Report 2009 submitted to the Bundestag (Lower House of Parliament), Germany’s Federal Government stated:
The 2nd Review Conference [of the 1997 Ottawa Convention held in Cartagena, Colombia, in 2009] succeeded in drafting a good report that draws conclusions on the previous five years and in adopting an action plan for the next five years which essentially focuses on the topics of universalization, clearance of mine fields, care for victims and international cooperation. Moreover, all contracting States present at the conference signed the Cartagena Declaration which emphasizes the central objectives of the Ottawa Convention (no future victims, comprehensive mine clearance and universalization).
As part of its commitment for a worldwide ban on anti-personnel mines, Germany assists in the removal of mines and other means of warfare, in particular in areas where mines and unexploded ordinances are a pressing humanitarian problem. To this purpose, approximately 185 million euros have been spent in 42 countries since 1992. … To be added is the German contribution of approximately 20 percent to the payments of the EU Commission. 
Germany, Federal Government, Annual Disarmament Report 2009, 13 January 2010, p. 23; see also Lower House of Federal Parliament (Bundestag), Reply by the Federal Government to the Minor Interpellation by Members Agnes Malczack, Dr. Gerhard Schick, Marieluise Beck (Bremen), further Members and the Parliamentary Group BÜNDNIS 90/DIE GRÜNEN, BT-Drs. 17/3185, 5 October 2010, pp. 4–5.
In 2010, in its report on German humanitarian aid abroad between 2006 and 2009, submitted to the Bundestag (Lower House of Parliament), Germany’s Federal Government stated:
Humanitarian removal of mines …
Humanitarian removal of mines … is designed to directly save the lives of individuals, mitigate the suffering of the population and reduce the socio-economic impact in countries affected by mines … Affected countries are supported in the removal of mines … , the population is informed about existing dangers and victims receive care. Moreover, the affected countries are supported in fulfilling their international legal obligations under the [1980] “UN Conventional Weapons Convention”, the [1997] “Ottawa Convention” and in the future the [2008] “Oslo Convention”. Projects are usually supported for a year, with subsequent support being envisaged if the projects ensure the development of national and local structures as well as sustainability. 
Germany, Report by the Federal Government on German Humanitarian Aid Abroad 2006 to 2009, 5 August 2010, p. 11.
The Federal Government also stated:
The Federal Foreign Office supports projects around the world for the humanitarian removal of mines and remnants of war and has given approximately 183.5 million euros since 1992 to projects in 42 countries. Efforts concerning the humanitarian removal of mines … , raising awareness about the danger, and care for the victims are usually supported in States parties to the Ottawa Convention … Exceptions are possible if mines … constitute a particularly pressing humanitarian problem. However, pursuant to the purpose identified in the budget, there are no financial resources for disarmament measures such as the destruction of stockpile. Geographic focal areas in the reporting period were Afghanistan, the Balkans, Angola, Cambodia, Tajikistan, Sudan, Viet Nam and Laos. In the reporting period, the total financial support amounted to 91.958.725 euros … including funds for the stability pacts in Afghanistan and South East Europe. … Added to this must be projects of the BMZ [Federal Ministry for Economic Cooperation and Development] of about 2.3 million euros in the reporting period. The armed forces (Bundeswehr) support the removal of mines and remnants of war by providing expertise and by on occasion seconding qualified personnel. 
Germany, Report by the Federal Government on German Humanitarian Aid Abroad 2006 to 2009, 5 August 2010, p. 13; see also Report by the Federal Government on Measures to Implement Security Council Resolution 1325 “Women, Peace and Security”, Communication of the Federal Government, 3 December 2010, BT-Drs. 17/4152, p. 13.
The Federal Government further stated:
Since most States affected [by landmines] do not dispose of the financial resources necessary for solving the problem with their own means, international support is still required. Through the contributions of the Federal Foreign Office, the BMZ and the BMVg [Federal Ministry of Defence], the Federal Government has positioned itself well internationally in the area of humanitarian removal of mines … and has, as one of the largest and most reliable global donors, lived up to its high-profile role in the implementation and dissemination of the [Ottawa Convention]. 
Germany, Report by the Federal Government on German Humanitarian Aid Abroad 2006 to 2009, 5 August 2010, p. 14.