Related Rule
Germany
Practice Relating to Rule 135. Children
Section E. Rehabilitation and reintegration of former child soldiers
In 2001, in its second periodic report to the Committee on the Rights of the Child under the Convention on the Rights of the Child, Germany stated:
814. The Federal Government has given practical help for the reintegration of child soldiers in an exemplary fashion by supporting the reintegration fund in Mozambique. There, 2,000 former child soldiers have found employment and new perspectives. In Angola and Uganda, too, the Federal Ministry for Economic Cooperation and Development supports projects for the reintegration of ex-combatants, including many children and young people.
816. Furthermore, the psychosocial situation of former child soldiers also has to be considered. For example, in cooperation with Medico International the Federal Government is sponsoring a project for the psychological rehabilitation of children and young people traumatized by war, especially former child soldiers and militias, in conjunction with their families and village communities. 
Germany, Second periodic report to the Committee on the Rights of the Child under Article 44 of the Convention on the Rights of the Child, UN Doc. CRC/C/83/Add.7, 24 July 2003, submitted 23 July 2001, §§ 814 and 816.
In 2005, in its Seventh Human Rights Policy Report submitted to the Bundestag (Lower House of Parliament), Germany’s Federal Government stated:
Apart from efforts in international fora and in the context of bilateral development cooperation, Germany financially and/or politically supports institutions and aid programmes for the demobilization and rehabilitation of former child soldiers as well as for the prevention of violations of the Optional Protocol to the Convention on the Rights of the Child on the involvement of children in armed conflict …
On the basis of the 2003 EU Guidelines on Children and Armed Conflict and the relating 2004 Plan of Action, [the Federal Government] together with its EU partners will work towards better protection of children in armed conflict, and to this purpose
- will continue giving financial support to projects on the demobilization, rehabilitation and reintegration of former child soldiers. 
Germany, Federal Government, Seventh Human Rights Policy Report, 17 June 2005, pp. 73 and 203.
In 2007, in its initial report to the Committee on the Rights of the Child under the 2000 Optional Protocol on the Involvement of Children in Armed Conflict, Germany stated:
7. At the national level, the Federal Government is promoting institutions and aid programmes for demobilization and rehabilitation of former child soldiers as well as to prevent contraventions of the Optional Protocol, inter alia through the regular voluntary German contribution and also through the funding of UNICEF projects, as well as through projects for the promotion of human rights. Germany is also making a contribution to rehabilitation and social reintegration of child soldiers, using the instrument of the Civil Peace Service with a number of peace specialists, e.g. those working in the field of trauma treatment.
Article 7
19. The Federal Republic of Germany is cooperating bilaterally and, within the framework of international organizations, with other State parties in order to achieve the objectives laid down in article 7. In doing so, Germany provides technical support and, to a considerable extent, financial assistance. Hence, within the framework of bilateral State development cooperation with Angola, Burundi, the Democratic Republic of the Congo, Liberia, Rwanda and Sierra Leone, there were projects worth about 83 million euros in the first quarter of 2006 designed to reintegrate ex-combatants, especially child soldiers. Further resources amounting to about 1.4 million euros have been committed for the care of child soldiers through Civil Peace Service programmes in Uganda, Sierra Leone and the Democratic Republic of the Congo.
20. Furthermore, former child soldiers are profiting from the various bilateral development cooperation programmes generally dedicated to the prevention of violence and conflict relating to children and juveniles. 
Germany, Initial report to the Committee on the Rights of the Child under the Optional Protocol to the Convention on the Rights of the Child on the Involvement of Children in Armed Conflict, UN Doc. CCPR/C/OPAC/DEU/1, 17 April 2007, submitted 5 January 2007, §§ 7 and 19–20.
In 2010, in reply to a Minor Interpellation in the Bundestag (Lower House of Parliament) entitled “Treatment of child soldiers by the German armed forces (Bundeswehr) during operations abroad”, Germany’s Federal Government wrote:
8. Which procedures are envisaged for the treatment of child soldiers injured, apprehended or detained by the Bundeswehr?
In the completed operation EUFOR RD CONGO, the following framework was adopted regarding apprehended or detained children and included in the pocket card of June 2006 for the German contingent of the operation EUFOR RD CONGO:
e) As soon as possible they are to be transferred into the care of the competent individuals or institutions, if necessary to an organization or authority specialized in dealing with victims of armed conflict and their re-integration. 
Germany, Lower House of Federal Parliament (Bundestag), Reply by the Federal Government to the Minor Interpellation by Members Paul Schäfer, Jan van Aken, Sevim Dağdelen, further Members and the Parliamentary Group DIE LINKE, BT-Drs. 17/2998, 21 September 2010, pp. 4–5.
In 2010, in its third and fourth periodic reports to the Committee on the Rights of the Child, Germany stated:
38. As [regards] projects to support children involved in armed conflict, Germany is currently promoting roughly 20 projects with the target group “child soldiers”, especially in the African Great Lakes area. The projects in Africa receiving support from the Federal Government to reintegrate child soldiers are promoted by much more than €100 million, the following being named as examples:
- The Federal Ministry for Economic Cooperation and Development is providing support via the GTZ [German Technical Cooperation] for instance with the project entitled “Promotion of Employment for Marginalized Youths” for the return and reintegration of young war refugees to their homes in Sierra Leone. The goal of the project, which is to run until 2013, is for disadvantaged juveniles and young adults to participate actively in their communities’ social, economic and political activities.
- With the project running until 2011 entitled “Integration of child soldiers (Phase I) and economic reintegration of disadvantaged juveniles and young adults in Maniema (Phase II)”, the Federal Ministry for Economic Cooperation and Development is promoting via the GTZ the social and economic reintegration of child soldiers in the Congo. The focus here is on catching up on primary schooling, training in preparation for taking up work, the creation of infrastructure, as well as support in establishing small businesses. The total German promotion of the project is €5.5 million.
39. Other projects of the Federal Government in the field of “Disarmament, Demobilisation and Reintegration” (DDR), such as in Burundi, Rwanda and Sudan, contain components of the reintegration of child soldiers or consciously contain support for children affected by conflicts – such as in Liberia or Nepal. Finally, the Federal Government promotes projects whose focus is not exclusively on child soldiers, but which at least also benefit them. 
Germany, Third and fourth periodic reports to the Committee on the Rights the Child, 11 September 2012, UN Doc. CRC/C/DEU/3-4, submitted 10 October 2010, §§ 38–39.
(footnote in original omitted)
In 2010, in reply to a Minor Interpellation in the Bundestag (Lower House of Parliament) entitled “Treatment of child soldiers by the German armed forces (Bundeswehr) during operations abroad”, Germany’s Federal Government wrote:
20. Which measures has the Federal Government financed in the areas where the Bundeswehr has so far been deployed, in particular Afghanistan and the Democratic Republic of Congo, to demobilize and reintegrate child soldiers (please provide years and costs of the measures)?
In the Democratic Republic of Congo, the Federal Government has been implementing a project on the economic integration of disadvantaged adolescents and young adults in Maniema province. Participants in this project receive intensive assistance and basic, practical education and vocational training in very small and small companies. Since 2005 almost 3,500 adolescents, including more than 200 former child soldiers, have successfully participated in the vocational training courses. 70 per cent of them are still working in the professions in which they were trained. It is planned to expand this project, for which so far 10.6 million euros have been pledged, to the South Kivu province. Through the so-called peace fund, established by the Federal Government in 2008 in the Democratic Republic of Congo, particularly disadvantaged population groups such as former child soldiers are given new employment opportunities and thus new perspectives in life. The measures by the fund, for which up to 50 million euros were made available, take place in the East of the Democratic Republic of Congo and in the capital Kinshasa.
Moreover the Federal Government is participating in the regional and Congo-specific donor fund of the World Bank on demobilization and reintegration of combatants (“Multi-Country Demobilization and Reintegration Programme” – MDRP) between 2002 and 2009 with approximately 12.5 million euros.
In Afghanistan, as part of the international division of labour [the Federal Government] has taken the lead concerning demobilization and reintegration measures for unlawful armed groups including their under-age members.
The Federal Government also finances a number of complementary measures in the area of basic education and enhancement of children’s rights with more than 1.6 million euros in the period 2004 to 2010. In 2003, it supported a UNICEF project for the reintegration of child soldiers in Afghanistan with 125,000 euros. 
Germany, Lower House of Federal Parliament (Bundestag), Reply by the Federal Government to the Minor Interpellation by Members Paul Schäfer, Jan van Aken, Sevim Dağdelen, further Members and the Parliamentary Group DIE LINKE, BT-Drs. 17/2998, 21 September 2010, pp. 7–8.