Related Rule
Cuba
Practice Relating to Rule 81. Restrictions on the Use of Landmines
In 2008, in a statement before the First Committee of the UN General Assembly during the thematic debate on conventional weapons, the representative of Cuba stated:
As a State Party to the [1980] Convention on Certain Conventional Weapons, Cuba fully shares the legitimate humanitarian concerns relating to the indiscriminate and irresponsible use of anti-personnel mines.
At the same time, it is well known that our country has been subjected for more than five decades to a continuous policy of hostility and aggression by the military superpower. As a result, Cuba is not able to renounce the use of this type of weapon for the preservation of its sovereignty and territorial integrity, in accordance with the legitimate right of self-defence recognized by the [1945] United Nations Charter. …
We will continue to fully support all efforts that, while maintaining the necessary balance between humanitarian and national security concerns, are aimed at eliminating the terrible effects that the indiscriminate and irresponsible use of anti-personnel land mines have on the civilian population and the economies of many countries. 
Cuba, Statement by the representative of Cuba before the First Committee of the UN General Assembly during the thematic debate on conventional weapons, 21 October 2008, p. 2.
In 2010, in a statement before the First Committee of the UN General Assembly during the thematic debate on conventional weapons, the representative of Cuba stated:
Cuba fully shares the legitimate humanitarian concerns relating to the indiscriminate and irresponsible use of anti-personnel mines.
At the same time, it is well known that our country has been subjected for more than five decades to a continuous policy of hostility and aggression by the military superpower.
As a result, Cuba is not able to renounce the use of this type of weapon for the preservation of its sovereignty and territorial integrity, in accordance with the legitimate right of self-defence recognized by the [1945] United Nations Charter. …
We will continue to fully support, … as a State Party to the [1980] Convention on Certain Conventional Weapons, all efforts that, while maintaining the necessary balance between humanitarian and national security concerns, are aimed at eliminating the terrible effects that the indiscriminate and irresponsible use of anti-personnel land mines have on the civilian population and the economies of many countries. 
Cuba, Statement by the representative of Cuba before the First Committee of the UN General Assembly during the thematic debate on conventional weapons, 19 October 2010, p. 2.