Cuba
Practice Relating to the Prohibition of Certain Types of Landmines
In 2008, in a statement before the First Committee of the UN General Assembly during the thematic debate on conventional weapons, the representative of Cuba stated:
As a State Party to the [1980] Convention on Certain Conventional Weapons, Cuba fully shares the legitimate humanitarian concerns relating to the indiscriminate and irresponsible use of anti-personnel mines.
At the same time, it is well known that our country has been subjected for more than five decades to a continuous policy of hostility and aggression by the military superpower. As a result, Cuba is not able to renounce the use of this type of weapon for the preservation of its sovereignty and territorial integrity, in accordance with the legitimate right of self-defence recognized by the [1945] United Nations Charter. It is due to this that Cuba is not a State Party to the [1997] Convention on the Prohibition of the Use, Stockpiling, Production and Transfer of Anti-Personnel Mines and Their Destruction.
We will continue to fully support all efforts that, while maintaining the necessary balance between humanitarian and national security concerns, are aimed at eliminating the terrible effects that the indiscriminate and irresponsible use of anti-personnel land mines have on the civilian population and the economies of many countries. 
Cuba, Statement by the representative of Cuba before the First Committee of the UN General Assembly during the thematic debate on conventional weapons, 21 October 2008, p. 2.
In 2010, in a statement before the First Committee of the UN General Assembly during the thematic debate on conventional weapons, the representative of Cuba stated:
Cuba fully shares the legitimate humanitarian concerns relating to the indiscriminate and irresponsible use of anti-personnel mines.
At the same time, it is well known that our country has been subjected for more than five decades to a continuous policy of hostility and aggression by the military superpower.
As a result, Cuba is not able to renounce the use of this type of weapon for the preservation of its sovereignty and territorial integrity, in accordance with the legitimate right of self-defence recognized by the [1945] United Nations Charter. It is due to this that Cuba is not a State Party to the [1997] Convention on the Prohibition of the Use, Stockpiling, Production and Transfer of Anti-Personnel Mines and Their Destruction.
We will continue to fully support, including as a State Party to the [1980] Convention on Certain Conventional Weapons, all efforts that, while maintaining the necessary balance between humanitarian and national security concerns, are aimed at eliminating the terrible effects that the indiscriminate and irresponsible use of anti-personnel land mines have on the civilian population and the economies of many countries. 
Cuba, Statement by the representative of Cuba before the First Committee of the UN General Assembly during the thematic debate on conventional weapons, 19 October 2010, p. 2.
In 2010, at the 12th Annual Meeting of the High Contracting Parties to the 1980 Convention on Certain Conventional Weapons, the delegation of Cuba stated:
As a State Party to the Convention on Certain Conventional Weapons, Cuba fully shares the legitimate humanitarian concerns associated with the indiscriminate and irresponsible use of Mines other than Anti-Personnel Mines but any measures to resolve this must also take into account the legitimate right of the people to self-defence, and to protect their territories from aggression.
It is well known that my country has been subjected during five decades to a policy of continuous hostility and aggression by the military superpower. As a result, Cuba is not able to renounce to the use of this type of weapon … [in order to ensure] the preservation of its sovereignty and territorial integrity, in accordance with the legitimate right of self-defence recognized by the [1945] United Nations Charter. Due to this, Cuba is not a State Party to the [1997] Convention on the Prohibition of the Use, Stockpiling, Production and Transfer of Anti-Personnel Mines and Their Destruction.
We will continue to fully support all the efforts that, while maintaining the necessary balance between humanitarian and national security concerns, are directed to eliminating the terrible effects that the indiscriminate and irresponsible use of anti-personnel land mines have on the civilian population and the economies of many countries. In this sense, Cuba has maintained a constructive attitude throughout the debates on this Convention and has presented concrete proposals that attempt to provide another focus to the discussions so that these take into account the opinions of developing countries. 
Cuba, Statement by the delegation of Cuba at the 12th Annual Meeting of the High Contracting Parties to the 1980 Convention on Certain Conventional Weapons, 25 November 2010.