Related Rule
Colombia
Practice Relating to Rule 51. Public and Private Property in Occupied Territory
Section C. Private property in occupied territory
Under Colombia’s Basic Military Manual (1995), it is forbidden “to seize … personal property” of non-combatants. 
Colombia, Derecho Internacional Humanitario – Manual Básico para las Personerías y las Fuerzas Armadas de Colombia, Ministerio de Defensa Nacional, 1995, p. 29.
According to Colombia’s Instructors’ Manual (1999), the instructor must recall the theme of respect for civilian property, livestock, money and movable and immovable objects. It points out that, during the conflict in Colombia, the property of the civilian population has not been properly respected. Livestock have been killed, houses destroyed and crops devastated, all acts that military personnel must not commit. 
Colombia, Derechos Humanos & Derecho Internacional Humanitario – Manual de Instrucción de la Guía de Conducta para el Soldado e Infante de Marina, Ministerio de Defensa Nacional, Oficina de Derechos Humanos, Fuerzas Militares de Colombia, Santafé de Bogotá, 1999, pp. 30 and 31.
Colombia’s Soldiers’ Manual (1999) orders troops to respect civilian property. 
Colombia, Derechos Humanos & Derecho Internacional Humanitario – Guía de Conducta para el Soldado e Infante de Marina, Ministerio de Defensa Nacional, Oficina de Derechos Humanos, Fuerzas Militares de Colombia, Santafé de Bogotá, 1999, p. 26.
Colombia’s Military Penal Code (1999) provides for a prison sentence for “anyone who, without any justification, orders or commits requisitions”, as well as for “anyone who requisitions without fulfilling the required formalities and without special circumstances obliging him to do so”. 
Colombia, Military Penal Code, 1999, Articles 176 and 177.