Related Rule
Cameroon
Practice Relating to Rule 154. Obedience to Superior Orders
Cameroon’s Disciplinary Regulations (1975) provides: “Obedience is the first duty of the subordinate and he shall loyally execute the orders he receives.” 
Cameroon, Règlement de discipline dans les Forces Armées, Décret No. 75/700, 6 November 1975, Article 19.
However, the manual also states:
The subordinate [is released from] his penal responsibility when he obeys orders of his superior …
If the order is manifestly illegal or stipulates the commission of an illegal act [in the meaning of Article 17 of the Disciplinary Regulations which provides for criminal responsibility, inter alia, for acts in violation of the laws and customs of war], the subordinate engages his penal responsibility …
The subordinate who believes he is being confronted with an illegal order has the duty to communicate his objections to the authority which gives them … If the order is maintained … concerning acts contrary to the laws and customs of war, the subordinate has the absolute right not to execute the order. 
Cameroon, Règlement de discipline dans les Forces Armées, Décret No. 75/700, 6 November 1975, Article 21.
Cameroon’s Instructor’s Manual (1992) provides: “It is forbidden for a soldier to obey orders constituting a crime.” 
Cameroon, Droit international humanitaire et droit de la guerre, Manuel de l’instructeur en vigueur dans les Forces Armées, Présidence de la République, Ministère de la Défense, Etat-major des Armées, Troisième Division, Edition 1992, p. 26, § 121(3).
Cameroon’s Instructor’s Manual (2006) states: “It is prohibited for soldiers to obey criminally unlawful orders.” 
Cameroon, Droit des conflits armés et droit international humanitaire, Manuel de l’instructeur en vigueur dans les forces de défense, Ministère de la Défense, Présidence de la République, Etat-major des Armées, 2006, p. 100, § 316; see also p. 142, § 421.
Cameroon’s Disciplinary Regulations (2007) states:
Article 19: Obedience
Since any commander derives from the law the authority which is vested in him, the obedience which is due to him by his subordinates is nothing but an act of submission to the law, the expression of the national will.
Obedience is thus the first duty of the subordinate and he shall loyally execute the orders he receives.
Article 20: Personal responsibility
The subordinate is responsible for the execution of orders or of the consequences of their non-execution. That responsibility excludes passive obedience.
He must embrace not only the letter but also the spirit of the orders received.
The commander being responsible for the orders he gives, reclamation is not permitted to the subordinate but when he has obeyed, except where the provisions of Article 21 below are concerned.
Article 21: Penal responsibility
The subordinate is released from his penal responsibility when he obeys orders of his superior, in conformity with Article 83-1 of the Penal Code.
If the order is manifestly illegal or stipulates the commission of an illegal act, in the meaning of Article 17 of the present Regulations, the subordinate engages his penal responsibility, according to the provisions of Articles 82-b and 83-2 of the Penal Code.
The subordinate who believes he is being presented with an illegal order has the duty to communicate his objections to the authority which has given them; he expressly indicates the illegal signification he gives to the disputed order. He receives any useful explication and necessary interpretation from his commander.
If the order is maintained:
- concerning acts contrary to the laws and customs of war, the subordinate has the absolute right not to execute the order.
In case of error, the subordinate cannot be exonerated of the sanctions which are implied in the non-execution of the order and its consequences.
If the subordinate is compelled by force or physical threat, he shall be completely relieved of his penal responsibility. 
Cameroon, Règlement de discipline générale dans les forces de défense, Décret N° 2007/199, Président de la République, 7 July 2007, Articles 19–21.