Related Rule
Cameroon
Practice Relating to Rule 10. Civilian Objects’ Loss of Protection from Attack
Cameroon’s Instructor’s Manual (1992) states: “Depending on the military situation, [civilian objects] can become military objectives (e.g. a house or bridge used for tactical purposes by the enemy).” 
Cameroon, Droit international humanitaire et droit de la guerre, Manuel de l’instructeur en vigueur dans les Forces Armées, Présidence de la République, Ministère de la Défense, Etat-major des Armées, Troisième Division, Edition 1992, p. 17.
Cameroon’s Instructor’s Manual (2006), in a section entitled “Definitions”, states that civilian objects “[a]re understood as all objects which are not military objects [objectives]. But according to the military situation they can become military objectives (e.g. houses or bridges used tactically by the enemy.” 
Cameroon, Droit des conflits armés et droit international humanitaire, Manuel de l’instructeur en vigueur dans les forces de défense, Ministère de la Défense, Présidence de la République, Etat-major des Armées, 2006, p. 92, § 352.13; see also p. 134, § 412.13.
Cameroon’s Instructor’s Manual (1992) states that in case of doubt as to whether an object is military or civilian in character, it should be considered as a civilian object. 
Cameroon, Droit international humanitaire et droit de la guerre, Manuel de l’instructeur en vigueur dans les Forces Armées, Présidence de la République, Ministère de la Défense, Etat-major des Armées, Troisième Division, Edition 1992, p. 17.
Cameroon’s Instructor’s Manual (2006) states: “In case of doubt [as to the nature of an object], a civilian object retains its civilian character.” 
Cameroon, Droit des conflits armés et droit international humanitaire, Manuel de l’instructeur en vigueur dans les forces de défense, Ministère de la Défense, Présidence de la République, Etat-major des Armées, 2006, p. 92, § 352.13; see also p. 134, § 412.13.