Related Rule
Côte d’Ivoire
Practice Relating to Rule 34. Journalists
Côte d’Ivoire’s Teaching Manual (2007) provides in Book III, Volume 2 (Instruction of second-year trainee officers):
I.1.4. Journalists
Apart from accredited war correspondents, one seldom sees journalists carrying out dangerous professional missions in conflict zones. They must in every respect be treated as civilians. They must be protected and must not be attacked. In order to guarantee their immunity, they must, however, behave in a way that makes them recognizable as civilians, i.e. not take a direct part in the hostilities. They can also obtain from their own government an identity card attesting to their status as journalist (an example can be found in Annex II to Additional Protocol I). They must accept the dangers and risks inherent to a conflict. In case of capture, they must be treated humanely, protected and handed over to the superior unit, which will treat them in conformity with the special provisions of the law applying to foreign civilians. In contrast to war correspondents, they are not entitled to prisoner-of-war status. 
Côte d’Ivoire, Droit de la guerre, Manuel d’instruction, Livre III, Tome 2: Instruction de l’élève officier d’active de 2ème année, Manuel de l’instructeur, Ministère de la Défense, Forces Armées Nationales, November 2007, p. 23; see also Droit de la guerre, Manuel d’instruction, Livre IV: Instruction du chef de section et du commandant de compagnie, Manuel de l’élève, Ministère de la Défense, Forces Armées Nationales, November 2007, p. 35.