Related Rule
Burundi
Practice Relating to Rule 90. Torture and Cruel, Inhuman or Degrading Treatment
Burundi’s Regulations on International Humanitarian Law (2007) lists “torture and inhuman treatment” as a “grave breach” of IHL. 
Burundi, Règlement n° 98 sur le droit international humanitaire, Ministère de la Défense Nationale et des Anciens Combattants, Projet “Moralisation” (BDI/B-05), August 2007, Part I bis, p. 26; see also Part I bis, pp. 45, 67 and 114, and Part I bis, pp. 26 and 27 (crimes against humanity).
The Regulations also states: “A prisoner of war may not … be subjected to psychological or physical torture for this purpose [to obtain information].” 
Burundi, Règlement n° 98 sur le droit international humanitaire, Ministère de la Défense Nationale et des Anciens Combattants, Projet “Moralisation” (BDI/B-05), August 2007, Part I bis, p. 24; see also Part I, pp. 10 and 15.
The Regulations further states: “Treat prisoners humanely. Physical or psychological torture is strictly prohibited.” 
Burundi, Règlement n° 98 sur le droit international humanitaire, Ministère de la Défense Nationale et des Anciens Combattants, Projet “Moralisation” (BDI/B-05), August 2007, Part I bis, p. 26.
Burundi’s Law on Genocide, Crimes against Humanity and War Crimes (2003) states:
[The following are] considered as war crimes:
A. Grave breaches of the Geneva Conventions of 8 August 1949, namely, any of the following acts aimed at persons or objects protected by the provisions of the Geneva Conventions:
b) torture or inhuman treatment …
c) wilfully causing great suffering, or serious injury to body or health;
B. Other serious violations of the laws and customs applicable in international armed conflicts, within the established framework of international law, namely, any of the following acts:
t) committing outrages upon personal dignity, in particular humiliating and degrading treatment;
C. In the case of an armed conflict not of an international character, serious violations of Article 3 common to the four Geneva Conventions of 12 August 1949, namely, any of the following acts committed against persons taking no direct part in hostilities, including members of armed forces who have laid down their arms and persons placed hors de combat by sickness, wounds, detention or any other cause:
a) violence to life and person, in particular … cruel treatment and torture;
b) committing outrages upon personal dignity, in particular humiliating and degrading treatment. 
Burundi, Law on Genocide, Crimes against Humanity and War Crimes, 2003, Article 4(A)(b)–(c), (B)(t) and (C)(a)–(b); see also Article 2(b) (genocide) and Article 3(f) and (k) (crimes against humanity).
Burundi’s Penal Code (2009) states:
“War crimes” means crimes which are committed as part of a plan or policy or as part of a large-scale commission of such crimes, in particular:
1. Any of the following grave breaches of the 1949 Geneva Conventions … :
2°. Torture or inhuman treatment … ;
3°. Wilfully causing great suffering, or serious injury to body or health;
2. Other serious violations of the laws and customs applicable in international armed conflict, within the established framework of international law, namely, any of the following acts:
21°. Committing outrages upon personal dignity, in particular humiliating and degrading treatment;
3. In the case of an armed conflict not of an international character, serious violations of article 3 common to the four 1949 Geneva Conventions … , namely, any of the following acts committed against persons taking no active part in the hostilities, including members of armed forces who have laid down their arms and those placed hors de combat by sickness, wounds, detention or any other cause:
1°. Violence to life and person, in particular … cruel treatment and torture;
2°. Committing outrages upon personal dignity, in particular humiliating and degrading treatment. 
Burundi, Penal Code, 2009, Article 198(1)(2°)–(3°), (2)(21°) and (3)(1°)–(2°).
In 2005, in its initial report to the Committee against Torture, Burundi stated:
There is no definition of torture as such in Burundian legislation. In practice, perpetrators of torture are prosecuted and punished for offences under ordinary law, such as occasioning actual bodily harm, as provided for in articles 146 to 150 of the Criminal Code. However, having ratified the Convention against Torture, Burundi recognizes and accepts the definition contained therein. 
Burundi, Initial report to the Committee against Torture, 13 March 2006, UN Doc. CAT/C/BDI/I, submitted 7 July 2005, § 41.