Related Rule
Australia
Practice Relating to Rule 80. Booby-Traps
Australia’s Commanders’ Guide (1994) states:
The primary concern with the employment of … booby traps is that they could be disturbed by innocent parties. Their use is permitted if they can be confined to areas where only lawful combatants would encounter them. 
Australia, Law of Armed Conflict, Commanders’ Guide, Australian Defence Force Publication, Operations Series, ADFP 37 Supplement 1 – Interim Edition, 7 March 1994, § 316.
The Guide also states:
Booby traps … may not be directed against civilians under any circumstances and they may not be used indiscriminately. Indiscriminate use is placement of such weapons which:
a.is not on, or directed at, a military objective; or
b.employs a method or means of delivery which cannot be directed at a specific military objective; or
c.may be expected to cause incidental loss of civilian life, injury to civilians, damage to civilian objects or a combination thereof, which would be excessive in relation to the concrete and direct military advantage anticipated. 
Australia, Law of Armed Conflict, Commanders’ Guide, Australian Defence Force Publication, Operations Series, ADFP 37 Supplement 1 – Interim Edition, 7 March 1994, § 937.
The Guide adds:
There are also restrictions on the use of … booby traps … These weapons may not be used in any city, town, village or other area containing a similar concentration of civilians in which combat between ground forces is not taking place or does not appear to be imminent, unless either:
(a) they are placed on or in the vicinity of a military objective belonging to or under the control of an enemy; or
(b) measures are taken to protect civilians from their effects, e.g. posting of warning signs or sentries, issue of warnings or provision of fences. 
Australia, Law of Armed Conflict, Commanders’ Guide, Australian Defence Force Publication, Operations Series, ADFP 37 Supplement 1 – Interim Edition, 7 March 1994, § 939.
The Guide further states:
941. The use of the following types of booby traps is prohibited:
a.any booby traps in the form of an apparently harmless portable object which is specifically designed and constructed (prefabricated) to contain explosive material and to detonate when it is disturbed or approached or,
b.booby traps which are in any way attached to or associated with:
(1) internationally recognized protective emblems and signs or signals;
(2) sick, wounded or dead persons;
(3) burial or cremation sites or graves;
(4) medical facilities, medical equipment, medical supplies or medical transportation;
(5) children’s toys or other portable objects or products specially designed for the feeding, health, hygiene, clothing or education of children;
(6) food or drink;
(7) kitchen utensils or appliances except in military establishments, military locations or military supply depots;
(8) objects clearly of a religious nature;
(9) historic monuments, works of art or places of worship which constitute the cultural or spiritual heritage of peoples; and
(10) animals or their carcasses.
942. The location of … areas where there is use of booby traps is to be recorded. 
Australia, Law of Armed Conflict, Commanders’ Guide, Australian Defence Force Publication, Operations Series, ADFP 37 Supplement 1 – Interim Edition, 7 March 1994, §§ 941 and 942.
Australia’s Defence Force Manual (1994) states:
All feasible precautions must be taken to protect civilians from the effects of … booby traps … They must not be directed at civilians nor may they be used indiscriminately. It is indiscriminate to place them so that they are not on or not directed at a military objective, to use them as a means of delivery which cannot be directed at a military target, or to place them so that they may be expected to cause excessive collateral damage, that is injury, loss or damage to civilians which is excessive in relation to the concrete and direct military advantage anticipated. 
Australia, Manual on Law of Armed Conflict, Australian Defence Force Publication, Operations Series, ADFP 37 – Interim Edition, 1994, § 421.
The manual further repeats the prohibitions contained in Article 6 of the 1980 Protocol II to the Convention on Certain Conventional Weapons. 
Australia, Manual on Law of Armed Conflict, Australian Defence Force Publication, Operations Series, ADFP 37 – Interim Edition, 1994, § 427.
The manual adds: “When booby-traps are not prohibited, those that are used must not be designed to cause unnecessary injury or suffering.” 
Australia, Manual on Law of Armed Conflict, Australian Defence Force Publication, Operations Series, ADFP 37 – Interim Edition, 1994, § 428.
The manual also states: “All feasible precautions must be taken to protect civilians from the effects of … booby-traps … They must not be directed at civilians nor may they be used indiscriminately.” 
Australia, Manual on Law of Armed Conflict, Australian Defence Force Publication, Operations Series, ADFP 37 – Interim Edition, 1994, § 421.
The manual further states:
Booby traps … must not be used in areas containing civilian concentrations if combat between ground forces is neither imminent nor actually taking place unless they are placed on, or in the vicinity, of an enemy military objective or there are protective measures for civilians such as warning signs, sentries, fences or other warnings to civilians. 
Australia, Manual on Law of Armed Conflict, Australian Defence Force Publication, Operations Series, ADFP 37 – Interim Edition, 1994, § 422.
Lastly, the manual provides:
The location of … areas in which there has been large scale and pre-planned use of booby-traps must be recorded. A record should also be kept of all other … booby-traps so that they may be disarmed when they are no longer required. 
Australia, Manual on Law of Armed Conflict, Australian Defence Force Publication, Operations Series, ADFP 37 – Interim Edition, 1994, § 423.
Australia’s LOAC Manual (2006) states:
4.36 … [A]ll feasible precautions must be taken to protect civilians from the effects of mines, booby traps and similar devices. They must not be directed at civilians nor may they be used indiscriminately. It is indiscriminate to place them so that they are not on or not directed at a military objective, to use a means of delivery which cannot be directed at a military target, or to place them so that they may be expected to cause excessive collateral damage, that is injury, loss or damage to civilians which is excessive in relation to the concrete and direct military advantage anticipated.
4.37 Booby traps and similar devices must not be used in areas containing civilian concentrations if combat between ground forces is neither imminent nor actually taking place unless they are placed on, or in the vicinity, of an enemy military objective or there are protective measures for civilians such as warning signs, sentries, fences or other warnings to civilians.
4.38 The location of all pre-planned minefields and areas in which there has been large scale and pre-planned use of booby traps must be recorded. A record should also be kept of all other minefields, mines and booby traps so that they may be disarmed when they are no longer required. 
Australia, The Manual of the Law of Armed Conflict, Australian Defence Doctrine Publication 06.4, Australian Defence Headquarters, 11 May 2006, §§ 4.36–4.38.
The LOAC Manual further states:
4.41 Booby traps are objects that are designed to injure or kill and which explode when a person approaches or disturbs an apparently harmless object or performs an apparently safe act.
4.42 Booby traps that appear to be apparently harmless portable objects which are specifically designed and constructed to contain explosive material are prohibited. In particular they should not be attached to or associated with:
• internationally recognised protective emblems;
• corpses, casualties or the sick;
• burial, cremation sites or graves;
• medical facilities, equipment, supplies or transportation;
• children’s toys or objects designed for feeding, health, hygiene, clothing or education of children;
• food or drink;
• kitchen utensils or appliances (except those in military establishments, locations or supply depots);
• objects of a religious nature;
• historic monuments, works of art or places of worship which constitute the cultural or spiritual heritage of peoples; or
• animals or their carcasses.
4.43 Where booby traps are not prohibited, those that are used must not be designed to cause unnecessary injury or suffering.
Other devices
4.44 “Other devices” are manually emplaced munitions and devices designed to kill, injure or damage and which are activated either remotely or by time delay. Restrictions on the use of these other devices are as for landmines and booby traps. 
Australia, The Manual of the Law of Armed Conflict, Australian Defence Doctrine Publication 06.4, Australian Defence Headquarters, 11 May 2006, §§ 4.41–4.44.
The LOAC Manual (2006) replaces both the Defence Force Manual (1994) and the Commanders’ Guide (1994).