Related Rule
Australia
Practice Relating to Rule 62. Improper Use of Flags or Military Emblems, Insignia or Uniforms of the Adversary
Australia’s Commanders’ Guide (1994) provides: “It is … prohibited to use the flags or military emblems, insignia or uniforms of the enemy while engaging in attacks or in order to shield, favour, protect or impede military operations.” 
Australia, Law of Armed Conflict, Commanders’ Guide, Australian Defence Force Publication, Operations Series, ADFP 37 Supplement 1 – Interim Edition, 7 March 1994, § 904.
The Guide also provides: “It is illegal to use in battle emblems, markings or clothing of … [the] enemy.” 
Australia, Law of Armed Conflict, Commanders’ Guide, Australian Defence Force Publication, Operations Series, ADFP 37 Supplement 1 – Interim Edition, 7 March 1994, § 507.
The Guide further states:
According to custom, it is permissible for a belligerent warship to use false colours and disguise her outward appearance in order to deceive an enemy, provided that prior to going into action the warship shows her true colours. 
Australia, Law of Armed Conflict, Commanders’ Guide, Australian Defence Force Publication, Operations Series, ADFP 37 Supplement 1 – Interim Edition, 7 March 1994, § 826.
Australia’s Defence Force Manual (1994) provides:
It is … prohibited to use the flags or military emblems, insignia or uniforms of the enemy while engaging in attacks or in order to shield, favour, protect or impede military operations. Enemy uniforms may otherwise be worn. 
Australia, Manual on Law of Armed Conflict, Australian Defence Force Publication, Operations Series, ADFP 37 – Interim Edition, 1994, § 705.
The manual also states: “Warships and auxiliary vessels may fly a false flag up until the moment of launching an attack but are prohibited from launching an attack whilst flying a false flag.” 
Australia, Manual on Law of Armed Conflict, Australian Defence Force Publication, Operations Series, ADFP 37 – Interim Edition, 1994, § 635.
Australia’s LOAC Manual (2006) states: “It is … prohibited to use the flags or military emblems, insignia or uniforms of the enemy while engaging in attacks or in order to shield, favour, protect or impede military operations. Enemy uniforms may otherwise be worn.” 
Australia, The Manual of the Law of Armed Conflict, Australian Defence Doctrine Publication 06.4, Australian Defence Headquarters, 11 May 2006, § 7.6.
In its chapter on “Maritime Operations”, the manual states: “Warships and auxiliary vessels may fly a false flag up until the moment of launching an attack but are prohibited from launching an attack whilst flying a false flag”. 
Australia, The Manual of the Law of Armed Conflict, Australian Defence Doctrine Publication 06.4, Australian Defence Headquarters, 11 May 2006, § 6.35.
In its chapter on “Compliance”, the manual states:
Provisions of the Hague Regulations 1907 are now recognised as part of customary law. Those regulations provide that the following acts are “especially forbidden”:
• to make improper use of … the national flag or of the military insignia and uniform of the enemy. 
Australia, The Manual of the Law of Armed Conflict, Australian Defence Doctrine Publication 06.4, Australian Defence Headquarters, 11 May 2006, § 13.29.
The LOAC Manual (2006) replaces both the Defence Force Manual (1994) and the Commanders’ Guide (1994).
Australia’s Criminal Code Act (1995), as amended to 2007, states with respect to serious war crimes that are committed in the course of an international armed conflict:
War crime – improper use of a flag, insignia or uniform of the adverse party
A person (the perpetrator) commits an offence if:
(a) the perpetrator uses a flag, insignia or uniform of the adverse party; and
(b) the perpetrator uses the flag, insignia or uniform while engaged in an attack or in order to shield, favour, protect or impede military operations; and
(c) the perpetrator knows of, or is reckless as to, the illegal nature of such use of the flag, insignia or uniform; and
(d) the perpetrator’s conduct results in death or serious personal injury; and
(e) the conduct takes place in the context of, and is associated with, an international armed conflict.
Penalty: Imprisonment for life. 
Australia, Criminal Code Act, 1995, as amended on to 2007, Chapter 8, § 268.42, p. 329.
Australia’s ICC (Consequential Amendments) Act (2002) incorporates in the Criminal Code the war crimes defined in the 1998 ICC Statute, including “improper use of a flag, insignia or uniform of the adverse party … while engaged in an attack or in order to shield, favour, protect or impede military operations” in international armed conflicts. 
Australia, ICC (Consequential Amendments) Act, 2002, Schedule 1, § 268.42.