Related Rule
Australia
Practice Relating to Rule 61. Improper Use of Other Internationally Recognized Emblems
Australia’s Commanders’ Guide (1994) provides: “The following examples constitute grave breaches or serious war crimes likely to warrant institution of criminal proceedings: … misusing or abusing … any … protected emblem for the purpose of gaining protection to which the user would not otherwise be entitled.” 
Australia, Law of Armed Conflict, Commanders’ Guide, Australian Defence Force Publication, Operations Series, ADFP 37 Supplement 1 – Interim Edition, 7 March 1994, § 1305(l).
Australia’s Defence Force Manual (1994) prohibits the “deliberate misuse of … protective symbols and emblems … including the protective emblem of cultural property”. 
Australia, Manual on Law of Armed Conflict, Australian Defence Force Publication, Operations Series, ADFP 37 – Interim Edition, 1994, § 704.
The manual also provides: “The following examples constitute grave breaches or serious war crimes likely to warrant institution of criminal proceedings: … misusing or abusing … any … protected emblem for the purpose of gaining protection to which the user would not otherwise be entitled.” 
Australia, Manual on Law of Armed Conflict, Australian Defence Force Publication, Operations Series, ADFP 37 – Interim Edition, 1994, § 1315(l).
Australia’s LOAC Manual (2006) prohibits the “deliberate misuse of … protective symbols and emblems … including … the protective emblem of cultural property”. 
Australia, The Manual of the Law of Armed Conflict, Australian Defence Doctrine Publication 06.4, Australian Defence Headquarters, 11 May 2006, § 7.5.
The LOAC Manual (2006) replaces both the Defence Force Manual (1994) and the Commanders’ Guide (1994).
Australia’s Geneva Conventions Act (1957), as amended in 2002, provides:
A person shall not, without the consent in writing of the Minister or of a person authorized in writing by the Minister to give consents … use for any purpose whatsoever any of the following:
such … emblems, identity cards, signs, signals, insignia or uniforms as are prescribed for the purpose of giving effect to [the 1977 Additional Protocol I]. 
Australia, Geneva Conventions Act, 1957, as amended in 2002, Section 15(1)(f).
Australia’s Geneva Conventions Act (1957), as amended in 2009, states:
Subject to this section, a person shall not, without the consent in writing of the Minister or of a person authorized in writing by the Minister to give consents under this section, use for any purpose whatsoever any of the following:
(f) such other emblems, identity cards, signs, signals, insignia or uniforms as are prescribed for the purpose of giving effect to [the 1977 Additional] Protocol I or [the 2005 Additional] Protocol III. 
Australia, Geneva Conventions Act, 1957, as amended in 2009, § 15(1)(f).