Related Rule
Australia
Practice Relating to Rule 60. Improper Use of the United Nations Emblem or Uniform
Australia’s Commanders’ Guide (1994) states: “Improper use … of the distinctive emblem of the United Nations is prohibited.” 
Australia, Law of Armed Conflict, Commanders’ Guide, Australian Defence Force Publication, Operations Series, ADFP 37 Supplement 1 – Interim Edition, 7 March 1994, § 903.
The Guide also states: “The United Nations symbol … is strictly protected and must not be abused.” 
Australia, Law of Armed Conflict, Commanders’ Guide, Australian Defence Force Publication, Operations Series, ADFP 37 Supplement 1 – Interim Edition, 7 March 1994, § 513.
The Guide further states: “The following are examples of grave breaches or serious war crimes likely to warrant institution of criminal proceedings: … misusing or abusing … any … protected emblem for the purpose of gaining protection to which the user would not otherwise be entitled.” 
Australia, Law of Armed Conflict, Commanders’ Guide, Australian Defence Force Publication, Operations Series, ADFP 37 Supplement 1 – Interim Edition, 7 March 1994, § 1305(l).
Australia’s Defence Force Manual (1994) provides: “Use of the distinctive emblem of the UN is prohibited except when authorised by the UN.” 
Australia, Manual on Law of Armed Conflict, Australian Defence Force Publication, Operations Series, ADFP 37 – Interim Edition, 1994, § 704.
The manual also states: “The following are examples of grave breaches or serious war crimes likely to warrant institution of criminal proceedings: … misusing or abusing … any … protected emblem for the purpose of gaining protection to which the user would not otherwise be entitled.” 
Australia, Manual on Law of Armed Conflict, Australian Defence Force Publication, Operations Series, ADFP 37 – Interim Edition, 1994, § 1315(l).
Australia’s LOAC Manual (2006) states: “Use of the distinctive emblem of the UN is prohibited except as authorised by the UN.” 
Australia, The Manual of the Law of Armed Conflict, Australian Defence Doctrine Publication 06.4, Australian Defence Headquarters, 11 May 2006, § 7.5.
The LOAC Manual (2006) replaces both the Defence Force Manual (1994) and the Commanders’ Guide (1994).
Australia’s Geneva Conventions Act (1957), as amended in 2002, provides:
A person shall not, without the consent in writing of the Minister or of a person authorized in writing by the Minister to give consents … use for any purpose whatsoever any of the following: …
such … emblems, identity cards, signs, signals, insignia or uniforms as are prescribed for the purpose of giving effect to [Additional Protocol I]. 
Australia, Geneva Conventions Act, 1957, as amended in 2002, Section 15(1)(f).
The war crimes provisions in this Act were removed in 2002 and incorporated into the Criminal Code Act 1995.
Australia’s Criminal Code Act (1995), as amended to 2007, states with respect to serious war crimes that are committed in the course of an international armed conflict:
268.43 War crime – improper use of a flag, insignia or uniform of the United Nations
A person (the perpetrator) commits an offence if:
(a) the perpetrator uses a flag, insignia or uniform of the United Nations; and
(b) the perpetrator uses the flag, insignia or uniform without the authority of the United Nations; and
(c) the perpetrator knows of, or is reckless as to, the illegal nature of such use of the flag, insignia or uniform; and
(d) the perpetrator’s conduct results in death or serious personal injury; and
(e) the conduct takes place in the context of, and is associated with, an international armed conflict.
Penalty: Imprisonment for life. 
Australia, Criminal Code Act, 1995, as amended to 2007, Chapter 8, § 268.43, p. 330.
Australia’s ICC (Consequential Amendments) Act (2002) incorporates in the Criminal Code the war crimes defined in the 1998 ICC Statute, including “improper use of a flag, insignia or uniform of the United Nations” in international armed conflicts. 
Australia, ICC (Consequential Amendments) Act, 2002, Schedule 1, § 268.43.