Related Rule
Australia
Practice Relating to Rule 57. Ruses of War
Australia’s Commanders’ Guide (1994) provides: “Ruses of war are lawful methods of deception that, over time, have been accepted as legitimate methods of fighting. Examples of ruses are: a. camouflage … b. decoys … c. false signals … d. surprise and ambush, and e. diversionary tactics.” 
Australia, Law of Armed Conflict, Commanders’ Guide, Australian Defence Force Publication, Operations Series, ADFP 37 Supplement 1 – Interim Edition, 7 March 1994, § 508.
The manual also states: “Ruses of war are used to obtain an advantage by misleading the enemy. They are permissible provided they are free from any suspicion of treachery or perfidy and do not violate any expressed or tacit agreement.” 
Australia, Law of Armed Conflict, Commanders’ Guide, Australian Defence Force Publication, Operations Series, ADFP 37 Supplement 1 – Interim Edition, 7 March 1994, § 901 (land warfare); see also § 826 (naval warfare).
Australia’s Defence Force Manual (1994) states:
Ruses of war and the employment of measures necessary for obtaining information about the enemy and the enemy country are permissible. Ruses of war are used to obtain an advantage by misleading the enemy. They are permissible provided they are free from any suspicion of treachery or perfidy. Legitimate ruses include surprises, ambushes, camouflage, decoys, mock operations and misinformation. Psychological operations are also permitted. 
Australia, Manual on Law of Armed Conflict, Australian Defence Force Publication, Operations Series, ADFP 37 – Interim Edition, 1994, § 702.
Australia’s LOAC Manual (2006) states:
Ruses of war and the employment of measures necessary for obtaining information about the enemy and the enemy country are permissible. Ruses of war are used to obtain an advantage by misleading the enemy. They are permissible provided they are free from any suspicion of treachery or perfidy. Legitimate ruses include surprises, ambushes, camouflage, decoys, mock operations and misinformation. Psychological operations are also permitted. 
Australia, The Manual of the Law of Armed Conflict, Australian Defence Doctrine Publication 06.4, Australian Defence Headquarters, 11 May 2006, § 7.2.
The LOAC Manual (2006) replaces both the Defence Force Manual (1994) and the Commanders’ Guide (1994).