Related Rule
Australia
Practice Relating to Rule 51. Public and Private Property in Occupied Territory
Section C. Private property in occupied territory
Australia’s Commanders’ Guide (1994) states:
In rare cases, privately-owned civilian property may be requisitioned by a military force whether on a battlefield or while exercising the power granted to it as an occupier. Requisition is only lawful if the property is essential to the success of military operations, the taking does not cause unnecessary hardship or deprivation, and adequate and reasonable compensation is paid. 
Australia, Law of Armed Conflict, Commanders’ Guide, Australian Defence Force Publication, Operations Series, ADFP 37 Supplement 1 – Interim Edition, 7 March 1994, § 610; see also § 1041.
Australia’s Defence Force Manual (1994) states that, in occupied areas:
Private property may not be confiscated.
The seizure of private movable property is governed by Article 53 [of the 1907 Hague Regulations]. By this rule all appliances adapted for the transmission of news or for the transport of persons or goods by land, sea or air, except where naval law governs, stores of arms and in general every kind of war material, even if they belong to private individuals, may be seized, but they must be restored and the indemnity fixed when peace is made.
These objects may be seized by, but they do not become the property of, the occupying power. The seizure operates merely as a transfer of the possession of the object to the occupying power while ownership remains with the private owner. In so far as the objects seized are capable of physical restoration, they must be restored at the conclusion of peace, and in so far as they have been consumed or have been destroyed or have perished, a cash indemnity must be paid when peace is made.
Requisition may be made of all commodities necessary for the maintenance of the occupying army such as: food and fuel supplies, liquor and tobacco, cloth for uniforms, leather for boots, and the like. The taking of such articles is forbidden unless they are actually required for the needs of the occupying forces. Goods or medical supplies available in the occupied territory are subject to requisition because they are needed for the forces of occupation and for administrative personnel. They may be requisitioned only after the requirements of the civilian population have been taken into account. In every case, the articles taken must be duly requisitioned, and be in proportion to the resources of the country.
Articles requisitioned should be paid for in ready money, but if this is not possible a receipt must be given for them and payment of the amount due must be made as soon as possible. Articles properly requisitioned become the property of the occupying power and pass out of the ownership of their former owner.
The prices to be paid for requisitioned supplies may be fixed by the commander of the occupying force. The prices of commodities on sale may also be regulated.
The right to billet troops on the inhabitants follows from the rights to requisition. 
Australia, Manual on Law of Armed Conflict, Australian Defence Force Publication, Operations Series, ADFP 37 – Interim Edition, 1994, §§ 1225–1231.
Australia’s LOAC Manual (2006) states that, in occupied areas:
12.43 Private property. Private property must be respected. Requisitions must be proportionate to the resources of the occupied territory and limited to the needs of the occupying power. Seizure is limited to public property.
12.44 Private property includes property, regardless of ownership, which is dedicated to religion, charity, education or to the arts or sciences.
12.45 The requirement to respect private property is subject to conditions necessitated by armed conflict. For example, military operations inevitably cause damage to private property and occupying forces are entitled to requisition property for necessary military purposes. Nevertheless, the principle of respect is important. Plundering and looting is subversive of military discipline. Theft and robbery remain punishable crimes in peace and war. The soldier in an enemy country must observe the same respect for civilian property as they would at home.
Confiscation
12.48 … Private property may not be confiscated …
Seizure
12.49 The seizure of private movable property is governed by H. IV. R [1907 Hague Regulations] Article 53. By this rule all appliances adapted for the transmission of news or for the transport of persons or goods by land, sea or air, except where naval law governs, stores of arms and in general every kind of war material, even if they belong to private individuals, may be seized, but they must be restored and the indemnity fixed when peace is made.
12.50 These objects may be seized by, but they do not become the property of, the occupying power. The seizure operates merely as a transfer of the possession of the object to the occupying power while ownership remains with the private owner. In so far as the objects seized are capable of physical restoration, they must be restored at the conclusion of peace, and in so far as they have been consumed or have been destroyed or have perished, a cash indemnity must be paid when peace is made.
Requisition
12.51 Requisition may be made of all commodities necessary for maintenance of the occupying army such as: food and fuel supplies, liquor and tobacco, cloth for uniforms, leather for boots, and the like. The taking of such articles is forbidden unless they are actually required for the needs of the occupying forces. Goods or medical supplies available in the occupied territory are subject to requisition because they are needed for the forces of occupation and for administrative personnel. They may be requisitioned only after the requirements of the civilian population have been taken into account. In every case, the articles taken must be duly requisitioned, and be in proportion to the resources of the country.
12.52 Articles requisitioned should be paid for in ready money, but if this is not possible a receipt must be given for them and payment of the amount due must be made as soon as possible. Articles properly requisitioned become the property of the occupying power and pass out of the ownership of their former owner.
12.53 The prices to be paid for requisitioned supplies may be fixed by the commander of the occupying force. The prices of commodities on sale may also be regulated.
12.54 The right to billet troops on the inhabitants follows from the rights to requisition. 
Australia, The Manual of the Law of Armed Conflict, Australian Defence Doctrine Publication 06.4, Australian Defence Headquarters, 11 May 2006, §§ 12.43–12.45 and 12.48–12.54.
The LOAC Manual (2006) replaces both the Defence Force Manual (1994) and the Commanders’ Guide (1994).
Australia’s Criminal Code Act (1995), as amended to 2007, states with respect to war crimes that are committed in the course of an international armed conflict:
268.51 War crimedestroying or seizing the enemys property
(1) A person (the perpetrator) commits an offence if:
(a) the perpetrator destroys or seizes certain property; and
(b) the property is property of an adverse party; and
(c) the property is protected from the destruction or seizure under article 18 of the Third Geneva Convention, article 53 of the Fourth Geneva Convention or article 54 of Protocol I to the Geneva Conventions; and
(d) the perpetrator knows of, or is reckless as to, the factual circumstances that establish that the property is so protected; and
(e) the destruction or seizure is not justified by military necessity; and
(f) the perpetrator’s conduct takes place in the context of, and is associated with, an international armed conflict.
Penalty: Imprisonment for 15 years.
(2) Strict liability applies to paragraph (1)(c). 
Australia, Criminal Code Act, 1995, as amended to 2007, Chapter 8, § 268.51, p. 335.