Related Rule
Australia
Practice Relating to Rule 34. Journalists
Australia’s Defence Force Manual (1994) states:
Civilian journalists engaged in dangerous professional missions in areas of armed conflict … are to be afforded the protection that normally applies to civilians. Granting of this protection is subject to the journalists not engaging in conduct that is inconsistent with their civilian status … Protection does not extend to war correspondents who are members of the military forces of a nation. War correspondents are detained as PW [prisoners of war] upon capture whereas civilian journalists are deemed protected persons and would not normally be detained. 
Australia, Manual on Law of Armed Conflict, Australian Defence Force Publication, Operations Series, ADFP 37 – Interim Edition, 1994, § 915; see also Law of Armed Conflict, Commanders’ Guide, Australian Defence Force Publication, Operations Series, ADFP 37 Supplement 1 – Interim Edition, 7 March 1994, § 623.
Australia’s LOAC Manual (2006) states:
Special provision is made for civilian journalists engaged in dangerous professional missions in areas of armed conflict. They are to be afforded the protection that normally applies to civilians. Granting of this protection is subject to the journalists not engaging in conduct that is inconsistent with their civilian status. Such journalists are normally issued with special identity cards. Protection does not extend to war correspondents who are members of the military forces of a nation. War correspondents are detained as PW [prisoners of war] upon capture whereas civilian journalists are deemed protected persons and would not normally be detained. 
Australia, The Manual of the Law of Armed Conflict, Australian Defence Doctrine Publication 06.4, Australian Defence Headquarters, 11 May 2006, § 9.15; see also § 10.14.
The LOAC Manual (2006) replaces both the Defence Force Manual (1994) and the Commanders’ Guide (1994).