Related Rule
Australia
Practice Relating to Rule 32. Humanitarian Relief Objects
Australia’s LOAC Manual (2006) states:
6.44 Classes of vessels exempt from attack. The following classes of enemy vessels are exempt from attack:
• vessels granted safe conduct by agreement between the belligerent parties including:
- vessels engaged in humanitarian missions including vessels carrying supplies indispensable to the survival of the civilian population, and vessels engaged in relief actions and rescue operations.
6.45 Such vessels are exempt from attack only if they:
• are innocently employed in their normal role,
• submit to identification and inspection when required, and
• do not intentionally hamper the movement of combatants and obey orders to stop or move out of the way when required. 
Australia, The Manual of the Law of Armed Conflict, Australian Defence Doctrine Publication 06.4, Australian Defence Headquarters, 11 May 2006, §§ 6.44 and 6.45.
The LOAC Manual (2006) replaces both the Defence Force Manual (1994) and the Commanders’ Guide (1994).
Australia’s War Crimes Act (1945) considers “any war crime within the meaning of the instrument of appointment of the Board of Inquiry [set up to investigate war crimes committed by enemy subjects]” as a war crime, including the destruction of relief ships. 
Australia, War Crimes Act, 1945, Section 3.
Australia’s Criminal Code Act (1995), as amended to 2007, states with respect to serious war crimes that are committed in the course of an international armed conflict:
268.37 War crimeattacking personnel or objects involved in a humanitarian assistance or peacekeeping mission
(2) A person (the perpetrator) commits an offence if:
(a) the perpetrator directs an attack; and
(b) the object of the attack is installations, material, units or vehicles involved in a humanitarian assistance or peacekeeping mission in accordance with the Charter of the United Nations; and
(c) the installations, material, units or vehicles are entitled to the protection given to civilian objects under the Geneva Conventions or Protocol I to the Geneva Conventions; and
(d) the perpetrator’s conduct takes place in the context of, and is associated with, an international armed conflict.
Penalty: Imprisonment for 20 years.
(3) Strict liability applies to paragraph … (2)(c). 
Australia, Criminal Code Act, 1995, as amended to 2007, Chapter 8, § 268.37, p. 326.
The Criminal Code Act also states with respect to war crimes that are other serious violations of the laws and customs of war applicable in a non-international armed conflict:
268.79 War crimeattacking personnel or objects involved in a humanitarian assistance or peacekeeping mission
(2) A person (the perpetrator) commits an offence if:
(a) the perpetrator directs an attack; and
(b) the object of the attack is installations, material, units or vehicles involved in a humanitarian assistance or peacekeeping mission in accordance with the Charter of the United Nations; and
(c) the installations, material, units or vehicles are entitled to the protection given to civilian objects under the Geneva Conventions and Protocol II to the Geneva Conventions; and
(d) the perpetrator’s conduct takes place in the context of, and is associated with, an armed conflict that is not an international armed conflict.
Penalty: Imprisonment for 20 years.
(3) Strict liability applies to paragraphs … (2)(c). 
Australia, Criminal Code Act, 1995, as amended to 2007, Chapter 8, § 268.79, p. 355.
Australia’s ICC (Consequential Amendments) Act (2002) incorporates in the Criminal Code the war crimes defined in the 1998 ICC Statute, including “attacking … objects involved in a humanitarian assistance … mission” in international and non-international armed conflicts. 
Australia, ICC (Consequential Amendments) Act, 2002, Schedule 1, §§ 268.37 and 268.79.