Related Rule
Australia
Practice Relating to Rule 31. Humanitarian Relief Personnel
Australia’s Defence Force Manual (1994) states:
In addition to the special immunity granted to civilian and military medical services there is a number of civilian bodies which are given special protection. These include the International Committee of the Red Cross (ICRC), the Red Cross and Red Crescent Societies … [and] personnel involved in relief operations. 
Australia, Manual on Law of Armed Conflict, Australian Defence Force Publication, Operations Series, ADFP 37 – Interim Edition, 1994, § 925.
Australia’s LOAC Manual (2006) states:
In addition to the special immunity granted to civilian and military medical services there are numerous civilian bodies which are given special protection. These include the ICRC, the Red Cross and Red Crescent Societies … [and] personnel involved in relief operations … 
Australia, The Manual of the Law of Armed Conflict, Australian Defence Doctrine Publication 06.4, Australian Defence Headquarters, 11 May 2006, § 9.26.
The LOAC Manual (2006) replaces both the Defence Force Manual (1994) and the Commanders’ Guide (1994).
Australia’s Criminal Code Act (1995), as amended to 2007, states with respect to serious war crimes that are committed in the course of an international armed conflict:
268.37 War crime – attacking personnel or objects involved in a humanitarian assistance or peacekeeping mission
(1) A person (the perpetrator) commits an offence if:
(a) the perpetrator directs an attack; and
(b) the object of the attack is personnel involved in a humanitarian assistance or peacekeeping mission in accordance with the Charter of the United Nations; and
(c) the personnel are entitled to the protection given to civilians under the Geneva Conventions or Protocol I to the Geneva Conventions; and
(d) the perpetrator’s conduct takes place in the context of, and is associated with, an international armed conflict.
Penalty: Imprisonment for life.
(3) Strict liability applies to paragraphs (1)(c). 
Australia, Criminal Code Act, 1995, as amended to 2007, Chapter 8, § 268.37, p. 326.
The Criminal Code Act also states, with respect to war crimes that are other serious violations of the laws and customs of war applicable in a non-international armed conflict:
268.79 War crime – attacking personnel or objects involved in a humanitarian assistance or peacekeeping mission
(1) A person (the perpetrator) commits an offence if:
(a) the perpetrator directs an attack; and
(b) the object of the attack is personnel involved in a humanitarian assistance or peacekeeping mission in accordance with the Charter of the United Nations; and
(c) the personnel are entitled to the protection given to civilians under the Geneva Conventions or Protocol II to the Geneva Conventions; and
(d) the perpetrator’s conduct takes place in the context of, and is associated with, an armed conflict that is not an international armed conflict.
Penalty: Imprisonment for life.
(3) Strict liability applies to paragraphs (1)(c). 
Australia, Criminal Code Act, 1995, as amended to 2007, Chapter 8, § 268.79, p. 355.
Australia’s ICC (Consequential Amendments) Act (2002) incorporates in the Criminal Code the war crimes defined in the 1998 ICC Statute, including “attacking personnel … involved in a humanitarian assistance … mission” in international and non-international armed conflicts. 
Australia, ICC (Consequential Amendments) Act, 2002, Schedule 1, §§ 268.37 and 268.79.
In a debate in the Senate in 1995, the Australian Government stated that attacks on UN and associated personnel would not be tolerated. 
Australia, Government statement, 13 November 1995, Senate Debates, Vol. 176, p. 2760, Recommendation 7.
In 2000, during a debate in the UN Security Council on the protection of UN and associated personnel and humanitarian personnel in conflict zones, Australia recalled the duty of States to provide physical protection and assistance to UN and humanitarian personnel. 
Australia, Statement before the UN Security Council, UN Doc. S/PV.4100 (Resumption 1), 9 February 2000, p. 6.