Related Rule
Australia
Practice Relating to Rule 116. Accounting for the Dead
Australia’s Defence Force Manual (1994) provides:
As soon as is practical following the death of a combatant, a belligerent shall record the following information to aid identification …
a) nationality;
b) regimental or serial number and rank;
c) surname and all first names;
d) date of birth, religion and any other particulars shown on the body’s identity card or identity discs; and
e) the date, cause and place of death and if the body is given a field burial, the exact location of the remains to enable future exhumation of the body, or remains if necessary. 
Australia, Manual on Law of Armed Conflict, Australian Defence Force Publication, Operations Series, ADFP 37 – Interim Edition, 1994, § 9-101.
Australia’s LOAC Manual (2006) states:
As soon as is practical following the death of a combatant, a belligerent shall record the following information to aid identification. Such information is to be passed to the national bureau direct, or through a protecting power to the Central Tracing Agency of the ICRC as follows:
• nationality;
• regimental or serial number and rank;
• surname and all first names;
• date of birth, religion and any other particulars shown on the body’s identity card or identity discs; and
• the date, cause and place of death and if the body is given a field burial, the exact location of the remains to enable future exhumation of the body, or remains if necessary. 
Australia, The Manual of the Law of Armed Conflict, Australian Defence Doctrine Publication 06.4, Australian Defence Headquarters, 11 May 2006, § 9.106.
The LOAC Manual (2006) replaces both the Defence Force Manual (1994) and the Commanders’ Guide (1994).
Australia’s Defence Force Manual (1994) provides:
As soon as is practical following the death of a combatant, a belligerent shall record the following information to aid identification … [including] the exact location of the remains to enable future exhumation of the body or remains if necessary. 
Australia, Manual on Law of Armed Conflict, Australian Defence Force Publication, Operations Series, ADFP 37 – Interim Edition, 1994, § 9-101.
Australia’s LOAC Manual (2006) states: “As soon as is practical following the death of a combatant, a belligerent shall record the following information to aid identification [including] the exact location of the remains to enable future exhumation of the body, or remains if necessary.” 
Australia, The Manual of the Law of Armed Conflict, Australian Defence Doctrine Publication 06.4, Australian Defence Headquarters, 11 May 2006, § 9.106.
The LOAC Manual (2006) replaces both the Defence Force Manual (1994) and the Commanders’ Guide (1994).
Australia’s Defence Force Manual (1994) provides that the graves of the deceased “are to be correctly marked to allow future exhumation”. 
Australia, Manual on Law of Armed Conflict, Australian Defence Force Publication, Operations Series, ADFP 37 – Interim Edition, 1994, § 999.
Australia’s LOAC Manual (2006) states that the graves of the deceased “are to be correctly marked to allow future exhumation”. 
Australia, The Manual of the Law of Armed Conflict, Australian Defence Doctrine Publication 06.4, Australian Defence Headquarters, 11 May 2006, § 9.104.
The LOAC Manual (2006) replaces both the Defence Force Manual (1994) and the Commanders’ Guide (1994).
Australia’s Defence Force Manual (1994) states that the graves “are to be correctly marked to allow future exhumation”. 
Australia, Manual on Law of Armed Conflict, Australian Defence Force Publication, Operations Series, ADFP 37 – Interim Edition, 1994, § 999.
Australia’s LOAC Manual (2006) states that the graves of the deceased “are to be correctly marked to allow future exhumation”. 
Australia, The Manual of the Law of Armed Conflict, Australian Defence Doctrine Publication 06.4, Australian Defence Headquarters, 11 May 2006, § 9.104.
The LOAC Manual (2006) replaces both the Defence Force Manual (1994) and the Commanders’ Guide (1994).
Australia’s Defence Force Manual (1994) states:
997. Particulars of Missing Persons. In order to facilitate the search for missing combatants, protected persons, civilians and persons who would not receive more favourable considerations under either the Geneva Conventions of Additional Protocols, each of the protagonists shall:
a. record the following information for each person … who has died:
(1) surname, all first names and nationality;
(2) place and date of birth;
(3) location of last residence and any distinguishing features;
(4) the first name of the father and the maiden name of the mother;
(5) the circumstances of captivity of detainment, including the date and place of detainment;
(6) the address to which correspondence may be sent to the captive or detainee; and
(7) the name and address of the person to be informed.
999. … Bodies shall be buried with one half of a double identity disc placed in the mouth of the deceased. The other half is to be kept for records by Graves Registration. In the event of only one identity disc, that is to remain with the body
9-101. As soon as is practical following the death of a combatant, a belligerent shall record the following information to aid identification. Such information is to be passed to the National Bureau direct, or through a Protecting Power to the Central Tracing Agency of the ICRC as follows:
a. nationality;
b. regimental or serial number and rank;
c. surname and all first names;
d. date of birth, religion and any other particulars shown on the body’s identity card of identity disc; and
e. the date, cause and place of death and if the body is given a field burial, the exact location of the remains to enable future exhumation of the body, or remains if necessary. 
Australia Manual on Law of Armed Conflict, Australian Defence Force Publication, Operations Series, ADFP 37 – Interim Edition, 1994, §§ 997, 999 and 9-101.
Australia’s LOAC Manual (2006) states:
9.102 Particulars of missing persons. In order to facilitate the search for missing combatants, protected persons, civilians and persons who would not receive more favourable considerations under either the Geneva Conventions or Additional Protocols, each of the protagonists shall:
• record the following information for each person detained, imprisoned or otherwise held in captivity for a period of two weeks, or who has died:
– surname, all first names and nationality;
– place and date of birth;
– location of last residence and any distinguishing features;
– the first name of the father and the maiden name of the mother;
– the circumstances of captivity or detainment, including the date and place of detainment;
– the address to which correspondence may be sent to the captive or detainee; and
– the name and address of the person to be informed.
9.104 … Bodies shall be buried with one half of a double identity disc placed in the mouth of the deceased. The other half is to be kept for records by Graves Registration. In the event of only one identity disc, that is to remain with the body.
9.106 As soon as is practical following the death of a combatant, a belligerent shall record the following information to aid identification. Such information is to be passed to the national bureau direct, or through a protecting power to the Central Tracing Agency of the ICRC as follows:
• nationality;
• regimental or serial number and rank;
• surname and all first names;
• date of birth, religion and any other particulars shown on the body’s identity card or identity discs; and
• the date, cause and place of death and if the body is given a field burial, the exact location of the remains to enable future exhumation of the body, or remains if necessary. 
Australia, The Manual of the Law of Armed Conflict, Australian Defence Doctrine Publication 06.4, Australian Defence Headquarters, 11 May 2006, §§ 9.102, 9.104 and 9.106.
The LOAC Manual (2006) replaces both the Defence Force Manual (1994) and the Commanders’ Guide (1994).