Related Rule
Australia
Practice Relating to Rule 115. Disposal of the Dead
Australia’s Defence Force Manual (1994) provides: “The minimum respect for the remains of the dead is a decent burial or cremation.” 
Australia, Manual on Law of Armed Conflict, Australian Defence Force Publication, Operations Series, ADFP 37 – Interim Edition, 1994, § 998.
The manual further states: “The deceased should be honourably interred.” 
Australia, Manual on Law of Armed Conflict, Australian Defence Force Publication, Operations Series, ADFP 37 – Interim Edition, 1994, § 999.
Australia’s LOAC Manual (2006) states:
9.103 …. The minimum respect for the remains of the dead is a decent burial or cremation …
9.104 … In the case of burial the deceased shall be honourably interred. 
Australia, The Manual of the Law of Armed Conflict, Australian Defence Doctrine Publication 06.4, Australian Defence Headquarters, 11 May 2006, §§ 9.103–9.104.
The LOAC Manual (2006) replaces both the Defence Force Manual (1994) and the Commanders’ Guide (1994).
According to Australia’s Defence Force Manual (1994) provides:
998. The remains of the dead, regardless of whether they are combatants, non-combatants, protected persons or civilians are to be respected, in particular their honour, family rights, religious convictions and practices and manners and customs. … The minimum respect for the remains of the dead is a decent burial or cremation in accordance with their religious practices.
999. The burial or cremation of the dead shall be carried out individually in accordance with the religious rights and practices of the deceased. 
Australia, Manual on Law of Armed Conflict, Australian Defence Force Publication, Operations Series, ADFP 37 – Interim Edition, 1994, §§ 998–999.
Australia’s LOAC Manual (2006) states:
9.103 The remains of the dead, regardless of whether they are combatants, non-combatants, protected persons or civilians are to be respected, in particular their honour, family rights, religious convictions and practices and manners and customs. … The minimum respect for the remains of the dead is a decent burial or cremation in accordance with their religious practices.
9.104 The burial or cremation of the dead shall be carried out individually in accordance with the religious rites and practices of the deceased. 
Australia, The Manual of the Law of Armed Conflict, Australian Defence Doctrine Publication 06.4, Australian Defence Headquarters, 11 May 2006, §§ 9.103–9.104.
The LOAC Manual (2006) replaces both the Defence Force Manual (1994) and the Commanders’ Guide (1994).
Australia’s Defence Force Manual (1994) states: “The cremation of the dead shall be carried out individually in accordance with the religious rights and practices of the deceased.” 
Australia, Manual on Law of Armed Conflict, Australian Defence Force Publication, Operations Series, ADFP 37 – Interim Edition, 1994, § 999.
The manual specifies: “Bodies shall only be cremated for imperative reasons of hygiene and health, or for the requirements of the deceased.” 
Australia, Manual on Law of Armed Conflict, Australian Defence Force Publication, Operations Series, ADFP 37 – Interim Edition, 1994, § 9-100.
Australia’s LOAC Manual (2006) states:
9.104 The … cremation of the dead shall be carried out individually in accordance with the religious rites and practices of the deceased …
9.105 Bodies shall only be cremated for imperative reasons of hygiene and health, or for the requirements of the deceased. 
Australia, The Manual of the Law of Armed Conflict, Australian Defence Doctrine Publication 06.4, Australian Defence Headquarters, 11 May 2006, §§ 9.104–9.105.
The LOAC Manual (2006) replaces both the Defence Force Manual (1994) and the Commanders’ Guide (1994).
Australia’s Defence Force Manual (1994) states: “The burial or cremation of the dead shall be carried out individually.” 
Australia, Manual on Law of Armed Conflict, Australian Defence Force Publication, Operations Series, ADFP 37 – Interim Edition, 1994, § 999.
Australia’s LOAC Manual (2006) states: “The burial or cremation of the dead shall be carried out individually.” 
Australia, The Manual of the Law of Armed Conflict, Australian Defence Doctrine Publication 06.4, Australian Defence Headquarters, 11 May 2006, § 9.104.
The LOAC Manual (2006) replaces both the Defence Force Manual (1994) and the Commanders’ Guide (1994).
Australia’s Defence Force Manual (1994) provides that the graves of the deceased shall “be grouped by nationality”. 
Australia Manual on Law of Armed Conflict, Australian Defence Force Publication, Operations Series, ADFP 37 – Interim Edition, 1994, § 999.
Australia’s LOAC Manual (2006) states that the graves of the deceased shall be “grouped by nationality”. 
Australia, The Manual of the Law of Armed Conflict, Australian Defence Doctrine Publication 06.4, Australian Defence Headquarters, 11 May 2006, § 9.104.
The LOAC Manual (2006) replaces both the Defence Force Manual (1994) and the Commanders’ Guide (1994).
Australia’s Defence Force Manual (1994) provides that the graves of the deceased “shall be respected”. 
Australia, Manual on Law of Armed Conflict, Australian Defence Force Publication, Operations Series, ADFP 37 – Interim Edition, 1994, § 999.
Australia’s LOAC Manual (2006) states that, for the deceased, “their graves [shall be] respected”. 
Australia, The Manual of the Law of Armed Conflict, Australian Defence Doctrine Publication 06.4, Australian Defence Headquarters, 11 May 2006, § 9.104.
The LOAC Manual (2006) replaces both the Defence Force Manual (1994) and the Commanders’ Guide (1994).