Related Rule
Australia
Practice Relating to Rule 111. Protection of the Wounded, Sick and Shipwrecked against Pillage and Ill-Treatment
Australia’s Defence Force Manual (1994) provides that all possible measures must be taken to protect the wounded and sick against pillage and ill-treatment. 
Australia, Manual on Law of Armed Conflict, Australian Defence Force Publication, Operations Series, ADFP 37 – Interim Edition, 1994, § 986.
Australia’s LOAC Manual (2006) states: “The parties to a conflict must take all possible measures to search for and collect the wounded, sick and shipwrecked [and] to protect them from pillage and ill-treatment”. 
Australia, The Manual of the Law of Armed Conflict, Australian Defence Doctrine Publication 06.4, Australian Defence Headquarters, 11 May 2006, §§ 9.92 and 9.97; see also § 6.68.
The LOAC Manual (2006) replaces both the Defence Force Manual (1994) and the Commanders’ Guide (1994).
Australia’s Defence Force Discipline Act (1982), in an article on looting, provides:
A person, being a defence member or a defence civilian, who, in the course of operations against the enemy, or in the course of operations undertaken by the Defence Force for the preservation of law and order or otherwise in aid of the civil authorities –
(b) takes any property from the body of a person … wounded [or] injured … in those operations …
is guilty of [an] offence. 
Australia, Defence Force Discipline Act, 1982, Section 48(1).
Australia’s Defence Force Discipline Act (1982), as amended to 2007, states:
48 Looting
(1) A person who is a defence member or a defence civilian is guilty of an offence if, in the course of operations against the enemy, or in the course of operations undertaken by the Defence Force for the preservation of law and order or otherwise in aid of the civil authorities, the person:
(a) takes any property that has been left exposed or unprotected; or
(b) takes any property from the body of a person who has been killed or from a person who has been wounded, injured or captured; or
(c) takes any vehicle, equipment or stores captured from or abandoned by the enemy.
Maximum punishment: Imprisonment for 5 years. 
Australia, Defence Force Discipline Act, 1982, as amended to 2007, Division 5A, Subdivision D, § 48(1), p. 56.
Australia’s Defence Force Manual (1994) states that while personnel from a disabled aircraft may be captured by non-combatants, they may not be subjected to violent assault by them. 
Australia, Manual on Law of Armed Conflict, Australian Defence Force Publication, Operations Series, ADFP 37 – Interim Edition, 1994, § 848.
Australia’s LOAC Manual (2006) states that “personnel from a disabled aircraft … may be captured by non-combatants, [however] they may not be subjected to violent assault by them”. 
Australia, The Manual of the Law of Armed Conflict, Australian Defence Doctrine Publication 06.4, Australian Defence Headquarters, 11 May 2006, § 8.52.
The LOAC Manual (2006) replaces both the Defence Force Manual (1994) and the Commanders’ Guide (1994).