Related Rule
Czechoslovakia
Practice Relating to Rule 160. Statutes of Limitation
In 1967, during a debate in the Third Committee of the UN General Assembly on the question of the punishment of war criminals and of persons who have committed crimes against humanity, the representative of Czechoslovakia stated:
35. … Her government fully supported the drafting of a binding legal instrument which would incorporate the principle of non-applicability of statutory limitation to war crimes and crimes against humanity.
37. … To apply statutory limitation to [war crimes and crimes against humanity] would be contrary to the provisions of the international instruments which she had mentioned [i.e. the 1945 London Agreement, the 1945 IMT Charter (Nuremberg) and UN General Assembly resolutions 3 (I), 95 (I) and 170 (II)] and to the spirit of the [1943 Moscow Declaration] … A number of countries, including the Czechoslovak Socialist Republic, had enacted legislation under which, in accordance with the rules of international law, statutory limitation did not apply to persons who had committed war crimes or crimes against humanity. Czechoslovakia’s Act No. 184, adopted in 1964, was based on the principles of international law and was aimed at assuring the Czechoslovak people … that no war criminal would escape punishment. It embodied the principle of the non-applicability of statutory limitation to war crimes and crimes against humanity, a principle which had more recently been confirmed by resolution 3 (XXI) of the [UN] Commission on Human Rights and resolution 1158 (XLI] of the Economic and Social Council and by the study submitted by the Secretary-General …
38. … The principle of non-applicability of statutory limitation was universally recognized as constituting one of the fundamental principles of international law …
39. … The non-applicability of statutory limitation to war crimes and crimes against humanity followed directly from international law … [C]onsequently, the application to such crimes of the rules of domestic law concerning statutory limitation would constitute a flagrant violation of the principles of international law. 
Czechoslovakia, Statement before the Third Committee of the UN General Assembly, UN Doc. A/C.3/SR.1514, 14 November 1967, §§ 35–39.
In a later meeting of the Third Committee on the same issue in 1968, Czechoslovakia stated: “The non-applicability of statutory limitation to war crimes and crimes against humanity constituted a valid and acknowledged principle of international law.” 
Czechoslovakia, Statement before the Third Committee of the UN General Assembly, UN Doc. A/C.3/SR.1567, 10 October 1968, § 22.