Mexico
Practice Relating to the Prohibition of Certain Types of Landmines
In 1998, Mexico adopted and published its Decree on the Ratification of the Ottawa Convention (1998). 
Mexico, Decree on the Ratification of the Ottawa Convention, 1998.
According to Mexico’s Constitution (1917), it is thereby considered as a Supreme Law in all the territory. 
Mexico, Constitution, 1917, Article 133.
In 1993, during a debate in the First Committee of the UN General Assembly, Mexico stated that it supported an export moratorium on anti-personnel landmines as “a step in the direction of the ultimate prohibition of anti-personnel mines and their destruction”. 
Mexico, Statement before the First Committee of the UN General Assembly, UN Doc. A/C.1/48/SR.28, 18 November 1993, p. 9.
Mexico was a member of the core group of countries that took responsibility for developing and promoting a mine ban treaty. It was one of the first nations in the world to call for a total ban on anti-personnel landmines and has been a diplomatic leader on the landmine issue since the negotiations on the Convention on Certain Conventional Weapons. 
Landmine Monitor Report 1999: Toward a Mine-Free World, available at http://www.the-monitor.org/index.php/publications/display?act=submit&pqs_year=1999&pqs_type=lm&pqs_report=mexico&pqs_section=.
On 7 February 1997, Mexico’s Permanent Mission to the OAS issued a Declaration of Principles of the Government of Mexico on the Production, Exportation and Use of Antipersonnel Landmines, which detailed the steps taken by Mexico in regional and multilateral fora towards banning anti-personnel mines and which declared the use of anti-personnel mines a violation of IHL. 
Landmine Monitor Report 1999: Toward a Mine-Free World, available at http://www.the-monitor.org/index.php/publications/display?act=submit&pqs_year=1999&pqs_type=lm&pqs_report=mexico&pqs_section=; “Declaración de Principios del Gobierno de México sobre la Producción, Exportación y Uso de Minas Terrestres Antipersonales”, Permanent Mission to the OAS, 7 February 1997.
At the 27th International Conference of the Red Cross and Red Crescent in 1999, Mexico stated that it would
redouble efforts and step up coordination with other governments and with civilian organizations for the universality and implementation of the Convention on the Prohibition of the Use, Stockpiling, Production and Transfer of Anti-personnel Mines and on their Destruction. 
Mexico, Statement at the 27th International Conference of the Red Cross and Red Crescent, Geneva, 31 October–6 November 1999.
In 2006, at the Seventh Meeting of States Parties to the 1997 Ottawa Convention on Anti-Personnel Mines, Mexico stated:
Mexico renews its commitment to the humanitarian objectives of the [1997 Ottawa] Convention because it is fully convinced of the need to continue progress towards the complete elimination of anti-personnel mines and towards paying full attention to the serious humanitarian consequences of their use for the civilian population and for the sustainable reconstruction and development of the affected communities. 
Mexico, Statement by the delegation of Mexico at the 7th Meeting of States Parties to the Convention on the Prohibition of the Use, Stockpiling, Production and Transfer of Anti-Personnel Mines and on their Destruction, Geneva, 18 September 2006.
In 2010, during a special session on international humanitarian law of the Committee on Juridical and Political Affairs of the Organization of American States, the representative of Mexico stated:
[Gathered] in Cartagena ten years after the entry into force [of the 1997 Ottawa Convention on Anti-Personnel Mines] and together with universal and regional organisations as well as civil society, we have renewed our commitment to achieve as soon as possible a world free of anti-personnel mines. 
Mexico, Statement by the delegation of Mexico during the special session on international humanitarian law of the Committee on Juridical and Political Affairs of the Organization of American States, Washington D.C., 29 January 2010.