Related Rule
China
Practice Relating to Rule 93. Rape and Other Forms of Sexual Violence
The PLA Rules of Discipline (1947) provides that women are not to be assailed with obscenities. 
China, Order on Re-promulgation of the Three Main Rules of Discipline and the Eight Points for Attention by the Headquarters of the PLA, 10 October 1947, in Selected Works of Mao Zedong, Vol. 4, The People’s Press, p. 1241, Point 8.
China’s Law Governing the Trial of War Criminals (1946) provides that rape and “kidnapping females and forcing them to become prostitutes” is a war crime. 
China, Law Governing the Trial of War Criminals, 1946, Article 3(3) and (17).
In its judgment in the Takashi Sakai case in 1946, the War Crimes Military Tribunal of the Chinese Ministry of National Defence found the accused guilty of war crimes and crimes against humanity inasmuch as he had incited or permitted his subordinates to commit, inter alia, acts of rape. 
China, War Crimes Military Tribunal of the Ministry of National Defence, Takashi Sakai case, Judgment, 29 August 1946.
At the 2006 Session of the UN Special Committee on Peacekeeping Operations, China stated:
The scandals in peacekeeping procurement and cases of sexual exploitation and sexual abuse involving peacekeepers that have come to light in recent years not only greatly damaged the overall image of UN peacekeeping operation, but also revealed gross deficiencies in the internal management of the UN. The Secretariat, senior management in particular, should draw lessons therefrom. It is necessary not only to strictly discipline persons responsible, but also to carry out reform at the system level with a view to improving management so as to ensure the proper ethics and behavior of peacekeepers, address such incidents appropriately and prevent them from recurrence. 
China, Statement at the 2006 Session of the UN Special Committee on Peacekeeping Operations, 27 February 2006.