Practice Relating to Rule 133. Property Rights of Displaced Persons

Protocol to the European Convention on Human Rights
Article 1 of the 1952 Protocol to the European Convention on Human Rights provides:
Every natural or legal person is entitled to the peaceful enjoyment of his possessions. No one shall be deprived of his possessions except in the public interest and subject to the conditions provided for by law and by the general principles of international law. 
Protocol to the European Convention for the Protection of Human Rights and Fundamental Freedoms, Paris, 20 March 1952, Article 1.
American Convention on Human Rights
Article 21(1) of the 1969 American Convention on Human Rights states: “Everyone has the right to the use and enjoyment of his property. The law may subordinate such use and enjoyment to the interest of society.” 
American Convention on Human Rights, adopted by the OAS Inter-American Specialized Conference on Human Rights, San José, 22 November 1969, also known as Pact of San José, Article 21(1).
African Charter on Human and Peoples’ Rights
Article 14 of the 1981 African Charter on Human and Peoples’ Rights provides:
The right to property shall be guaranteed. It may only be encroached upon in the interest of public need or in the general interest of the community and in accordance with the provisions of appropriate laws. 
African Charter on Human and Peoples’ Rights, adopted by the Eighteenth Ordinary Session of the OAU Assembly of Heads of State and Government, Nairobi, 27 June 1981, OAU Doc. CAB/LEG/67/3 rev.5, Article 14.
Kampala Convention
Article 9(2) of the 2009 Kampala Convention provides that States Parties shall:
Take necessary measures to protect individual, collective and cultural property left behind by displaced persons as well as in areas where internally displaced persons are located, either within the jurisdiction of the State Party, or in areas under their effective control. 
African Union Convention for the Protection and Assistance of Internally Displaced Persons in Africa, adopted in Kampala, Uganda, 23 October 2009, Article 9(2)(i).
Article 11(4) of the Convention provides: “States Parties shall establish appropriate mechanisms providing for simplified procedures where necessary, for resolving disputes relating to the property of internally displaced persons.” 
African Union Convention for the Protection and Assistance of Internally Displaced Persons in Africa, adopted in Kampala, Uganda, 23 October 2009, Article 11(4).
Recommendation on the Tragic Situation of Civilians in Bosnia and Herzegovina
Paragraph 4(a) of the 1992 Recommendation on the Tragic Situation of Civilians in Bosnia and Herzegovina provides that each party to the conflict guarantees to those who leave temporarily the territory it controls that “their goods, assets and belongings will be respected and protected”. 
Recommendation on the Tragic Situation of Civilians in Bosnia and Herzegovina, adopted at the invitation of the International Committee of the Red Cross and signed by Representatives of Mr. Alija Izetbegović (President of the Republic of Bosnia and Herzegovina and President of the Party of Democratic Action), Representative of Mr. Radovan Karadžić (President of the Serbian Democratic Party), and Representative of Mr. Mate Boban (President of the Croatian Democratic Community), Geneva, 1 October 1992, § 4(a).
Guiding Principles on Internal Displacement
Principle 21 of the 1998 Guiding Principles on Internal Displacement stipulates:
1. No one shall be arbitrarily deprived of property and possessions.
2. The property and possessions of internally displaced persons shall in all circumstances be protected, in particular, against the following acts:
(a) Pillage;
(b) Direct or indiscriminate attacks or other acts of violence;
(c) Being used to shield military operations or objectives;
(d) Being made the object of reprisal; and
(e) Being destroyed or appropriated as a form of collective punishment.
3. Property and possessions left behind by internally displaced persons should be protected against destruction and arbitrary and illegal appropriation, occupation or use. 
Guiding Principles on Internal Displacement, presented to the UN Commission on Human Rights by the Special Representative of the UN Secretary-General on Internally Displaced Persons, UN Doc. E/CN.4/1998/53/Add.2, 11 February 1998, Principle 21.
No data.
Bosnia and Herzegovina
Since 1997, the Federation of Bosnia and Herzegovina has adopted new property laws safeguarding property rights in order to implement the 1995 Agreement on Refugees and Displaced Persons annexed to the Dayton Accords. These laws mainly deal with abandoned property and occupancy rights. It has also adopted instructions, claim forms and information sheets. 
Bosnia and Herzegovina, Federation, Law on Sale of Apartments with Occupancy Rights, 1997; Law on the Cessation of the Application of the Law on Temporary Abandoned Real Property Owned by Citizens, 1998; Law on the Cessation of the Application of the Law on Abandoned Apartments, 1998.
Bosnia and Herzegovina
In 1998, the Republika Srpska of Bosnia and Herzegovina adopted a new property law safeguarding property rights in order to implement the 1995 Agreement on Refugees and Displaced Persons annexed to the Dayton Accords. This law mainly deals with abandoned property. It also adopted instructions, claim forms and information sheets. 
Bosnia and Herzegovina, Republika Srpska, Law on the Cessation of the Application of the Law on the Use of Abandoned Property, 1998.
Colombia
According to Colombia’s Law on Internally Displaced Persons (1997), IDPs have the right to retain ownership and possession of abandoned property. 
Colombia, Law on Internally Displaced Persons, 1997, Article 18.
Denmark
Denmark’s Military Criminal Code (1973), as amended in 1978, provides:
Any person who uses war instruments or procedures the application of which violates an international agreement entered into by Denmark or the general rules of international law, shall be liable to the same penalty [i.e. a fine, lenient imprisonment or up to 12 years’ imprisonment]. 
Denmark, Military Criminal Code, 1973, as amended in 1978, § 25(1).
Denmark’s Military Criminal Code (2005) provides:
Any person who deliberately uses war means [“krigsmiddel”] or procedures the application of which violates an international agreement entered into by Denmark or international customary law, shall be liable to the same penalty [i.e. imprisonment up to life imprisonment]. 
Denmark, Military Criminal Code, 2005, § 36(2).
Djibouti
Djibouti’s Law on the Status of Refugees in the Republic of Djibouti (2017) provides:
CHAPTER I
GENERAL PROVISIONS
Article 2: Definition of the term asylum seeker 
Under this law, the term asylum seeker or person applying for refugee status means any person who leaves the country of his or her nationality or, if he or she has no nationality, the country in which he or she was habitually resident in order to apply for refugee status in the Republic of Djibouti and who is awaiting a decision by the relevant competent authorities on his or her application.
Article 3: Definition of the term refugee 
Under this law and in accordance with the Geneva Convention of 28 July 1951 relating to the Status of Refugees and its Protocol of 31 January 1967 and the OAU Convention of 10 September 1969 Governing the Specific Aspects of Refugee Problems in Africa, the term refugee shall mean every person:
b. who, owing to external aggression, occupation, foreign domination or events seriously disturbing public order in either part or the whole of his or her country of origin or nationality, is compelled to leave his or her place of habitual residence in order to seek refuge in another place outside his or her country of origin or nationality.
CHAPTER III
RIGHTS AND OBLIGATIONS OF REFUGEES AND ASYLUM SEEKERS
Article 14: Fundamental rights
1. Without prejudice to Chapters I and II above, all of the fundamental rights and provisions set out in Chapters II, III, IV and V of the Geneva Convention of 28 July 1951 relating to the Status of Refugees and those set out in the OAU Convention of 10 September 1969 relating to refugees apply to every refugee and asylum seeker lawfully resident in the territory of the Republic of Djibouti and within the limits of rights accorded to nationals. These notably include the right:
- to property[.] 
Djibouti, Law on the Status of Refugees in the Republic of Djibouti, 2017, Articles 2, 3(b) and 14(1).
Georgia
Georgia’s Law on Internally Displaced Persons (2014) states:
Article 6. Definition of an IDP [internationally displaced person]
1. A citizen of Georgia or a stateless person with a status residing in Georgia shall be considered as an IDP, if he/she was forced to leave his/her permanent place of residence because of threat to his/her or his/her family member[s’] life, health or freedom caused by the occupation of the territory by a foreign state, aggression, armed conflict, mass violence and/or massive human rights violations and/or he/she cannot return to his/her permanent place of residence due to the above mentioned reasons.
Article 15. Protection of IDP Property Rights in their Places of Permanent Residence
1. The State recognizes the IDPs’ right to restitution, which is hereditary, on the real estate they left in the places of permanent residence.
2. The State shall take all possible measures to protect the property owned and/or possessed by an IDP in the places of permanent residence which he/she had to leave due to reasons as referred to in paragraph 1, Article 6 of this Law, from robbery, destruction, arbitrary and unlawful use and appropriation.
3. After elimination of [the] circumstances as referred to in paragraph 1 of Article 6[,] in case[s] whe[re an] IDP returns to his/her place of permanent residence, the State shall take all possible measures to ensure that the real estate which an IDP had lawfully owned and/or possessed before displacement and w[as] forced to leave, is returned to a lawful owner and possessor.
4. The right envisaged by paragraph 1 of this Article shall be maintained in … cases wh[ere] durable housing has been provided to IDPs. 
Georgia, Law on Internally Displaced Persons, 2014, Articles 6(1) and 15.
Peru
Peru’s Regulations to the Law on Internal Displacement (2005) states:
Internally displaced persons who return to their places of habitual residence or who have resettled in another part of the country have a right to:
i) the protection … , to the extent possible, of their property and possessions which they left behind. 
Peru, Regulations to the Law on Internal Displacement, 2005, Article 6(i).
Colombia
According to Colombian case-law, IDPs have the right to retain ownership and possession of abandoned property. 
Colombia, Constitutional Court, Constitutional Case No. C-092, Judgment, 7 March 1996.
Colombia
In 2006, during the consideration of the third periodic report of Colombia before the Committee on the Rights of the Child, a representative of Colombia stated: “There … [are] also provisions [in the law] to avoid the alienation of property while the owner … [is] displaced.” 
Colombia, Statement before the Committee on the Rights of the Child during the consideration of the third periodic report of Colombia, 4 July 2006, UN Doc. CRC/C/SR.1148, § 42.
Egypt
In 1996, during a debate in the UN Commission on Human Rights in relation to Bosnia and Herzegovina, Egypt stated that “refugees and displaced persons must be allowed to … recover their possessions”. 
Egypt, Statement before the UN Commission on Human Rights, UN Doc. E/CN.4/1996/SR.47, 17 April 1996, § 35.
Germany
In 2005, in its Seventh Human Rights Policy Report submitted to the Bundestag (Lower House of Parliament), Germany’s Federal Government stated:
With the 1998 guidelines on the handling of crises related to internally displaced persons (“Guiding Principles on Internal Displacement”) by the then Representative of the UN Secretary-General on the Human Rights of Internally Displaced Persons, Francis Deng, the international community has a practice-oriented document, which summarizes existing standards on the protection of internally displaced persons and gives further recommendations. Although these guiding principles are not a binding instrument under international law, their acceptance by States, international organizations and NGOs has continued to grow over the past years, so that now they are virtually regarded as customary international law. 
Germany, Federal Government, Seventh Human Rights Policy Report, 17 June 2005, pp. 97–98.
Nepal
In its National Policies on Internally Displaced Persons adopted in 2007, Nepal stated:
1. Background
Due to natural disasters, human-made circumstances and disasters, armed conflict and situations of violence and fears having [been] created therefrom, persons and families are forcefully displaced from their homes or places of their habitual residence and thus they are time and again required to face such situations that force them to reside in other parts of the country. …
Therefore, the State is required to make appropriate provisions for their return to their place of habitual residence or settling them voluntarily in other places in the country. …
3. Definitions:
For the purpose of these Policies:
(a) “Internally Displaced Person” means a person who is living somewhere else in the country after having [been] forced to flee or leave their home or place of habitual residence due to armed conflict or situation of violence or gross violations of human rights or natural disasters or human-made disasters … or with an intention of avoiding the effects of such situations.
8. Policies
In relation to internal displacement, the following policies will be adopted:
8.1 Regarding Human Rights Protection
8.1.10 Arrangements will be made for giving protection from destruction, indiscriminate or illegal utilization or use of goods and property left [behind], but owned, by displaced persons. 
Nepal, National Policies on Internally Displaced Persons, adopted by the Government on 22 February 2007, §§ 1, 3, 8, and 8.1.10.
UN Security Council
In February 1996, in a statement by its President on the situation in Croatia, the UN Security Council referred to the right of the local Serb population “to return to their homes … and to reclaim possession of property”. 
UN Security Council, Statement by the President, UN Doc. S/PRST/1996/8, 23 February 1996, p. 2.
In another statement by its President in December on the situation in Croatia, the UN Security Council deplored “the continued failure by the Government of Croatia to effectively safeguard the property rights [of refugees and IDPs], especially the situation where many of the Serbs who had returned to the former sectors had been unable to regain possession of their properties”. 
UN Security Council, Statement by the President, UN Doc. S/PRST/1996/48, 20 December 1996, p. 1.
UN General Assembly
In a resolution adopted in 2003 on Palestine refugees’ properties and their revenues, the UN General Assembly:
Recalling that the Universal Declaration of Human Rights and the principles of international law uphold the principle that no one shall be arbitrarily deprived of his or her property,
Recalling in particular its resolution 394 (V) of 14 December 1950, in which it directed the Conciliation Commission, in consultation with the parties concerned, to prescribe measures for the protection of the rights, property and interests of the Palestine refugees,
1. Reaffirms that the Palestine refugees are entitled to their property and to the income derived therefrom, in conformity with the principles of equity and justice;
2. Requests the Secretary-General to take all appropriate steps, in consultation with the United Nations Conciliation Commission for Palestine, for the protection of Arab property, assets and property rights in Israel. 
UN General Assembly, Res. 58/94, 9 December 2003, preamble and §§ 1–2, voting record: 164-5-4-18.
UN General Assembly
In a resolution adopted in 2004 on Palestine refugees’ properties and their revenues, the UN General Assembly:
Recalling that the Universal Declaration of Human Rights and the principles of international law uphold the principle that no one shall be arbitrarily deprived of his or her property,
Recalling in particular its resolution 394 (V) of 14 December 1950, in which it directed the Conciliation Commission, in consultation with the parties concerned, to prescribe measures for the protection of the rights, property and interests of the Palestine refugees,
1. Reaffirms that the Palestine refugees are entitled to their property and to the income derived therefrom, in conformity with the principles of equity and justice;
2. Requests the Secretary-General to take all appropriate steps, in consultation with the United Nations Conciliation Commission for Palestine, for the protection of Arab property, assets and property rights in Israel. 
UN General Assembly, Res. 59/120, 10 December 2004, preamble and §§ 1–2, voting record: 161-6-9-15.
UN General Assembly
In a resolution adopted in 2005 on Palestine refugees’ properties and their revenues, the UN General Assembly:
Recalling that the Universal Declaration of Human Rights and the principles of international law uphold the principle that no one shall be arbitrarily deprived of his or her property,
Recalling in particular its resolution 394 (V) of 14 December 1950, in which it directed the Conciliation Commission, in consultation with the parties concerned, to prescribe measures for the protection of the rights, property and interests of the Palestine refugees,
1. Reaffirms that the Palestine refugees are entitled to their property and to the income derived therefrom, in conformity with the principles of equity and justice;
2. Requests the Secretary-General to take all appropriate steps, in consultation with the United Nations Conciliation Commission for Palestine, for the protection of Arab property, assets and property rights in Israel. 
UN General Assembly, Res. 60/103, 8 December 2005, preamble and §§ 1–2, voting record: 160-6-3-22.
UN General Assembly
In a resolution adopted in 2006 on Palestine refugees’ properties and their revenues, the UN General Assembly:
Recalling that the Universal Declaration of Human Rights and the principles of international law uphold the principle that no one shall be arbitrarily deprived of his or her property,
Recalling in particular its resolution 394 (V) of 14 December 1950, in which it directed the [United Nations] Conciliation Commission [for Palestine], in consultation with the parties concerned, to prescribe measures for the protection of the rights, property and interests of the Palestine refugees,
1. Reaffirms that the Palestine refugees are entitled to their property and to the income derived therefrom, in conformity with the principles of equity and justice;
2. Requests the Secretary-General to take all appropriate steps, in consultation with the United Nations Conciliation Commission for Palestine, for the protection of Arab property, assets and property rights in Israel;
3. Calls once again upon Israel to render all facilities and assistance to the Secretary-General in the implementation of the present resolution;
4. Calls upon all the parties concerned to provide the Secretary-General with any pertinent information in their possession concerning Arab property, assets and property rights in Israel that would assist him in the implementation of the present resolution. 
UN General Assembly, Res. 61/115, 14 December 2006, preamble and §§ 1–4, voting record: 170-6-8-8.
UN General Assembly
In a resolution adopted in 2007 on Palestine refugees’ properties and their revenues, the UN General Assembly:
Recalling that the Universal Declaration of Human Rights and the principles of international law uphold the principle that no one shall be arbitrarily deprived of his or her property,
Recalling in particular its resolution 394 (V) of 14 December 1950, in which it directed the [United Nations] Conciliation Commission [for Palestine], in consultation with the parties concerned, to prescribe measures for the protection of the rights, property and interests of the Palestine refugees,
1. Reaffirms that the Palestine refugees are entitled to their property and to the income derived therefrom, in conformity with the principles of equity and justice;
2. Requests the Secretary-General to take all appropriate steps, in consultation with the United Nations Conciliation Commission for Palestine, for the protection of Arab property, assets and property rights in Israel;
3. Calls once again upon Israel to render all facilities and assistance to the Secretary-General in the implementation of the present resolution;
4. Calls upon all the parties concerned to provide the Secretary-General with any pertinent information in their possession concerning Arab property, assets and property rights in Israel that would assist him in the implementation of the present resolution. 
UN General Assembly, Res. 62/105, 17 December 2007, preamble and §§ 1–4, voting record: 170-6-3-13.
UN Commission on Human Rights
In a resolution adopted in 1996, the UN Commission on Human Rights expressed its concern over continuing human rights violations within Bosnia and Herzegovina, including “actions that undermine the principle of the right to return, including enforcement of legislation which restricts rights to claim ‘socially owned’ property throughout the State of Bosnia and Herzegovina”. 
UN Commission on Human Rights, Res. 1996/71, 23 April 1996, § 3(b), adopted without a vote.
UN Commission on Human Rights
In a resolution adopted in 2003 on internally displaced persons, the UN Commission on Human Rights:
Expresses concern at the persistent problems of large numbers of internally displaced persons worldwide, in particular the risk of extreme poverty and socio-economic exclusion, their limited access to humanitarian assistance, vulnerability to human rights violations and difficulties resulting from their specific situation, such as lack of food, medication or shelter and issues pertinent during their reintegration, including, in appropriate cases, the need for the restitution of or compensation for property. 
UN Commission on Human Rights, Res. 2003/51, 23 April 2003, § 2, adopted without a vote.
UN Commission on Human Rights
In a resolution adopted in 2004 on human rights in the occupied Syrian Golan, the UN Commission on Human Rights:
Guided by the relevant provisions of the Charter of the United Nations, international law and the Universal Declaration of Human Rights, and reaffirming the applicability of the Geneva Convention relative to the Protection of Civilian Persons in Time of War, of 12 August 1949, and the relevant provisions of the Hague Conventions of 1899 and 1907 to the occupied Syrian Golan,
2. Also calls upon Israel to desist from changing the physical character, demographic composition, institutional structure and legal status of the occupied Syrian Golan, and emphasizes that the displaced persons of the population of the occupied Syrian Golan must be allowed to return to their homes and to recover their properties. 
UN Commission on Human Rights, Res. 2004/8, 15 April 2004, preamble and § 2, voting record: 31-1-21.
UN Commission on Human Rights
In a resolution adopted in 2004 on internally displaced persons, the UN Commission on Human Rights:
Expresses concern at the persistent problems of large numbers of internally displaced persons worldwide, in particular the risk of extreme poverty and socio-economic exclusion, their limited access to humanitarian assistance, vulnerability to human rights violations and difficulties resulting from their specific situation, such as lack of food, medication or shelter and issues pertinent during their reintegration, including, in appropriate cases, the need for the restitution of or compensation for property. 
UN Commission on Human Rights, Res. 2004/55, 20 April 2004, § 2, adopted without a vote.
UN Commission on Human Rights
In a resolution adopted in 2005 on human rights in the occupied Syrian Golan, the UN Commission on Human Rights:
Guided by the relevant provisions of the Charter of the United Nations, international law and the Universal Declaration of Human Rights, and reaffirming the applicability of the Geneva Convention relative to the Protection of Civilian Persons in Time of War, of 12 August 1949, and the relevant provisions of the Hague Conventions of 1899 and 1907 to the occupied Syrian Golan,
2. Also calls upon Israel to desist from changing the physical character, demographic composition, institutional structure and legal status of the occupied Syrian Golan, and emphasizes that the displaced persons of the population of the occupied Syrian Golan must be allowed to return to their homes and to recover their properties. 
UN Commission on Human Rights, Res. 2005/8, 14 April 2005, preamble and § 2, voting record: 32-2-19.
UN Commission on Human Rights
In a resolution adopted in 2005 on internally displaced persons, the UN Commission on Human Rights:
Expresses concern at the persistent problems of large numbers of internally displaced persons worldwide, in particular the risk of extreme poverty and socioeconomic exclusion, their limited access to humanitarian assistance, vulnerability to human rights violations, as well as difficulties resulting from their specific situation, such as lack of food, medication or shelter and issues pertinent during their reintegration, including, in appropriate cases, the need for the restitution of or compensation for property. 
UN Commission on Human Rights, Res. 2005/46, 19 April 2005, § 3, adopted without a vote.
UN Human Rights Council
In a resolution adopted in 2006 on human rights in the occupied Syrian Golan, the UN Human Rights Council:
Guided by the relevant provisions of the Charter of the United Nations, international law and the Universal Declaration of Human Rights and reaffirming the applicability of the Geneva Convention relative to the Protection of Civilian Persons in Time of War, of 12 August 1949, and the relevant provisions of the Hague conventions of 1899 and 1907 to the occupied Syrian Golan,
2. Also calls upon Israel to desist from changing the physical character, demographic composition, institutional structure and legal status of the occupied Syrian Golan, and emphasizes that the displaced persons of the population of the occupied Syrian Golan must be allowed to return to their homes and to recover their property. 
UN Human Rights Council, Res. 2/3, 27 November 2006, preamble and § 2, voting record: 32-1-14.
UN Sub-Commission on Human Rights
In a resolution adopted in 1998 on housing and property restitution in the context of the return of refugees and internally displaced persons, the UN Sub-Commission on Human Rights:
Confirms that the adoption or application of laws by States which are designed to or result in the loss or removal of tenancy, use, ownership or other rights connected with housing or property, the active retraction of the right to reside within a particular place, or laws of abandonment employed against refugees or internally displaced persons pose serious impediments to the return and reintegration of refugees and internally displaced persons and to reconstruction and reconciliation. 
UN Sub-Commission on Human Rights, Res. 1998/26, 22 August 1998, § 3.
UN Secretary-General
In 1996, in a report on the situation in Bosnia and Herzegovina, the UN Secretary-General noted:
An independent Commission for Real Property Claims of Displaced Persons and Refugees has been established … Its function is to receive and decide any claims for real property in Bosnia and Herzegovina where the property has not voluntarily been sold or otherwise transferred since 1 April 1992, and where the claimant does not enjoy possession of the property. 
UN Secretary-General, Report pursuant to resolution 1035 (1995), UN Doc. S/1996/210, 29 March 1996, § 20.
UN Commission on Human Rights (Special Rapporteur)
In 1996, in a special report on minorities in the context of the former Yugoslavia, the Special Rapporteur of the UN Commission on Human Rights stated: “The Croatian authorities must act firmly to safeguard property rights of Serbs in the former sectors.” 
UN Commission on Human Rights, Special Rapporteur on the situation of Human Rights in the Former Yugoslavia, Special periodic report on minorities, UN Doc. E/CN.4/1997/8, 25 October 1996, § 127.
In another report in 1997, the Special Rapporteur recommended that any “laws on the allocation of abandoned property inconsistent with the Dayton agreements and international law must immediately be repealed”. 
UN Commission on Human Rights, Special Rapporteur on the Situation of Human Rights in the Former Yugoslavia, Periodic report, UN Doc. E/CN.4/1997/56, 29 January 1997, § 55.
High Representative for the Implementation of the Peace Agreement on Bosnia and Herzegovina
Since September 1998, the High Representative for the Implementation of the Peace Agreement on Bosnia and Herzegovina has adopted numerous decisions in the field of property laws and return of displaced persons and refugees. These decisions mainly deal with occupancy rights, abandoned property, socially owned property and return of confiscated property. 
Office of the High Representative for the Implementation of the Peace Agreement on Bosnia and Herzegovina, Decisions in the field of property laws and return of displaced persons and refugees, available on www.ohr.int.
No data.
Peace Implementation Conference for Bosnia and Herzegovina
The Chairman’s Conclusions of the Florence Peace Implementation Conference for Bosnia and Herzegovina in 1996 called on:
the Commission on Real Property Claims for Refugees and Displaced Persons now established in Sarajevo with the assistance of the International Organisation for Migration (IOM), to proceed urgently with its task of registration so as to provide property owners with the assurance that their rights will be preserved on local authorities to cooperate with the Commission on the parties to repeal or appropriately amend property laws which are inconsistent with the right, as set out in the Peace Agreement, of return and to their property. 
Peace Implementation Conference for Bosnia and Herzegovina, Florence, 13–14 June 1996, Chairman’s Conclusions, annexed to Letter dated 9 July 1996 from the UN Secretary-General to the President of the UN Security Council, UN Doc. S/1996/542, 10 July 1996, Appendix I, § 15.
No data.
No data.
No data.